octopamine


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octopamine

[äk′tō·pə‚mēn]
(pharmacology)
C8H11NO2 A crystalline compound, used as an adrenergic drug.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Mazmanian's team turned on neurons that produce the chemical octopamine, that activation canceled out the effect of L.
The Effect of Octopamine and Chelrythrine Chloride on Phonotaxis in Unexposed Acheta domesticus.
Several neurohormones have been identified in decapod precardiac organs, which are ideally located to release their products in hemolymph on its bypass to the heart (Alexandrowicz, 1953), which include serotonin, dopamine, and octopamine (Beltz & Kravitz, 1983); this last one relaxes the anterior cardio-arterial muscle and causes contraction of the posterior valve in lobster, and it changes hemolymph distribution toward the anterior arterial system in crabs (Airries & McMahon, 1994).
Robinson, "Octopamine influences division of labor in honey bee colonies," Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology, vol.
For instance, some EO components may compete with octopamine in binding to its receptor, causing an increase in the level of cAMP and calcium in nervous cells and modifying the neuron activity in Periplaneta americana L.
It is known that terpenoids such as thymol bind to octopamine or to GABA receptors [44, 45], although other studies have also found that essential oils components such as thymol and linalool alter the expression of AChE [19, 20, 27, 46].
Other contents of the mixture consisted of anhydrous caffeine, sensoril ashwagandha extract, bitter orange extract, n-methyltyramine, hordenine, tyramine, octopamine, huperzine A, yohimbine HCL, mucuna pruriens, and Bioperine.
At the molecular level, neurotransmission also appears highly conserved from Drosophila to mammalian species with classical neurotransmitters including acetylcholine, GABA, glutamate, dopamine, octopamine, serotonin, histamine, and peptide neurotransmitters such as neuropeptide Y/neuropeptide F and insulin-like peptides common to both [69, 141, 142].