odd

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odd

1. 
a. not divisible by two
b. represented or indicated by a number that is not divisible by two
2. Maths (of a function) changing sign but not absolute value when the sign of the independent variable is changed, as in y=x3
3. Golf
a. one stroke more than the score of one's opponent
b. an advantage or handicap of one stroke added to or taken away from a player's score

ODD

(1) (Optical Disc Drive or Optical Digital Disc) See optical disc.

(2) (Object Data Definition) A description of the data in an object. See object.
References in classic literature ?
You'll see I've written that in big letters, and I tell you if ever a man deserved to have his name written in capitals Scarlett Trent does, and the oddest part of it is he knows you, and he was awfully decent to me all the time.
Lorry paused, and shook his head at him in the oddest manner, as if he were compelled against his will to add, internally, "you know there really is so much too much of you!"
Well, it is the oddest thing to me, that a man should use such a pretty girl so ill!
Colin listened and heard it, the oddest sound in the world to hear inside a house, a hoarse "caw-caw."
As they did so, they swayed from side to side in the oddest way, and beat their hands upon their knees; and I followed their example.
These fellows, knowing the extravagant gullibility of the age, set their wits to work in the imagination of improbable possibilities - of odd accidents, as they term them; but to a reflecting intellect(like mine," I added, in parenthesis, putting my forefinger unconsciously to the side of my nose,) "to a contemplative understanding such as I myself possess, it seems evident at once that the marvelous increase of late in these 'odd accidents' is by far the oddest accident of all.
Those innumerable talks with her made her youth as vivid to me as my own, and so much more quaint, for, to a child, the oddest of things, and the most richly coloured picture-book, is that his mother was once a child also, and the contrast between what she is and what she was is perhaps the source of all humour.
The shop seemed to be full of all manner of curious things-- but the oddest part of it all was, that whenever she looked hard at any shelf, to make out exactly what it had on it, that particular shelf was always quite empty: though the others round it were crowded as full as they could hold.