odontology

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odontology

[‚ō‚dän′täl·ə·jē]
(vertebrate zoology)
A branch of science that deals with the formation, development, and abnormalities of teeth.
References in periodicals archive ?
The scientific subspace however, had to adapt to the standards in odontological journals, and/or take on a subordinate position in GH journals.
Chlorexidine digluconate is considered the "golden standard" in odontology and it has been widely used in studies analysing odontological materials and thus has been chosen for this study.
The control group (CG) was composed of patients undergoing odontological treatment at our teaching clinic in the Disciplina de Clinica Integrada da Faculdade de Odontologia, da Universidade Paulista de Sao Paulo.
40) The Museum of National History in Almaty maintains a physical anthropology department that displays tableaus on Kazakh ethnogenesis based on the somatic, dermatological, serological, odontological, and craniological criteria worked out by Ismagulov.
The purpose of this comunication is to share the experience with a case of osteoma cutis in a 46 years old woman who requested odontological treatment at the dental clinic of the Universidad del Valle.
Part of the funds will be used to buy Odontological Equipment for Dentistry.
The impossibility to exert a strict control on effective bio-security rules demonstrates that bioethics plays a vital role backing odontological service.
If the tissue is of human origin, mtDNA analysis can be used in conjunction with medical, anthropological, and odontological examinations to assist in the identification process.
At various times Mr Cohen was president of the Birmingham Dental Students' Society (of which he wrote a history), of the Central Counties branch of the British Dental Association and of the Odontological section of the Royal Society of Medicine.
It has low antigenicity associated with high biocompatibility and constitutes one of the major raw materials for biomaterial applications, which include pharmaceutical, odontological, and medical areas.
The odontological evidence does not, therefore, point clearly or convincingly to John Irvine McInnes as being the originator of the bite.