Oedipal phase

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Oedipal phase

[′ēd·ə·pəl ‚fāz]
(psychology)
In psychoanalytic theory, the period of psychosexual development that represents a time of conflict between the child and parents, lasting approximately from 4 to 6 years of age.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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At the end of the pre-oedipal stage, the child eventually realizes that her mother is a being separate from her and begins the period of psychological separation, a primordial characteristic of the oedipal period that will last until the girl enters maturity.
In particular it can be observed that discussion is generally limited to a focus on the traditional oedipal period (Liebman, Steven, & Abell, 2000); an emphasis on the development of sexual identity and masculinity; and the development of male babies (e.g.
Other topics discussed in the paper include the Oedipal period in children, play choices of boys and girls, early cognitive stages in understanding about sex and gender, and the appearance of sex differences in play styles and preferences.
According to Bettelheim, fairy tales serve a therapeutic purpose: big bad wolves and handsome princes guide the child through the thorny thickets of the Oedipal period, offering "recovery" and "consolation" to the developing psyche.