Oedipal

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Oedipal

[′ēd·ə·pəl]
(psychology)
Pertaining to the Oedipus complex.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Further, Strachey deliberately (Oedipally?) distorted the Victorians to create a vision of his generation as brave oppositional figures, rebels, Moderns.
Buhler observes, the love scenes undercut the possibility that the prince is attracted to his mother, "transferr[ing] all indications of incestuous desire, besides that of Claudius for Gertrude, to Laertes's intense attachment to his sister" (50), thereby helping Branagh to dissociate his rendition of the play from Oedipally driven ones, like those of Zeffirelli and Olivier.
(P 1.358-62) But while he rows away, still facing the cave, the child, as if punished for an unlawful act committed in the maternal cave-realm, becomes suddenly aware of an oedipally paternal monitory apparition:
Knowledge, here and elsewhere in Three Farmers, is oedipally charged; knowledge of anything is knowledge about our parents.
(7) I'd like to experiment with what it might mean to disregard Bloom's distinction here: First to regard "stance" as "style," and then to imagine "stance" not as the late writer's position in relation to his oedipally construed forerunners, but as the later writer's repertoire of positions in relation to a whole range of historical and imaginary pasts (times, places, persons, and objects).
The scene when Marcello enters his mother's bedroom is, moreover, Oedipally charged: he complains about her state of undress; she says she's just had a dream in which he came through the door and kissed her.
Shklar ends her essay with the observation that if one were to criticize American political theory "it should not be that it is Oedipally attached to liberalism" but that "it failed to understand itself and lacked the imagination to project a plausibly better future." Yet if there is any central cultural motif to American culture it is the belief in newness and its capacity to restore or modernize itself.