Esophagoscopy

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esophagoscopy

[e‚säf·ə′gäs·kə·pē]
(medicine)
Endoscopic examination of the interior of the esophagus.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Esophagoscopy

 

examination of the inner surface of the esophagus with a special instrument, esophagoscope, which is equipped with an optical system. The esophagoscope is introduced through the mouth under local or general anesthesia. Esophagoscopy is used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. It is helpful in detecting tumors and other diseases of the esophagus, as well as the cicatricial narrowing of the esophageal lumen. Esophagoscopy is also used in taking a biopsy, performing bougienage, and locating and removing a foreign body. The once widely used rigid steel esophagoscopes were replaced in the 1970’s by flexible and less traumatic fiberscopes.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, rigid oesophagoscopy is necessary when there are severe problems in cases of sharp and penetrative objects.
During oesophagoscopy, eleven patients (78.57%) had their foreign body extracted, whereas, spontaneous propulsion happened in three patients only (21.43%).
This retrospective study was conducted at the Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH), Karachi, and comprised medical charts of patients who had undergone oesophagoscopy for removal of foreign body (fish and chicken bone) from 1990 to 2015.
One patient developed abscess 4 days after Oesophagoscopy was performed for foreign body removal.
Under anaesthetic, oesophagoscopy revealed the origin of the protruding tissue mass to be at the cricopharyngeus, establishing the diagnosis of a prolapsed Zenker's diverticulum that was repaired via a left lateral cervical incision.
Tumour length can be assessed with oesophagoscopy (Figure 4), barium swallow study, computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasonography and histopathological examination of resected specimen.
Some went on--unnecessarily--to computed tomography (CT) scans, upper oesophagoscopy (in a colleague complaining of dysphagia), lung function testing, bronchoscopy, tissue biopsy (of pleura, lymph node and lung), magnetic resonance imaging scans and CT angiograms, and ran into complications following invasive tests.
Direct laryngoscopy, bronchoscopy and oesophagoscopy were performed before operating if injuries to the respiratory or food passages were suspected.
Other investigations or diagnostic procedures undertaken in the private sector included upper oesophagoscopy (in a participant complaining of dysphagia), lung function testing, bronchoscopy, tissue biopsy (of pleura, lymph node and lung), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans and CAT angiograms.