necessity

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Related to of necessity: contingence, out of necessity

necessity

1. Philosophy
a. a condition, principle, or conclusion that cannot be otherwise
b. the constraining force of physical determinants on all aspects of life
2. Logic
a. the property of being necessary
b. a statement asserting that some property is essential or statement is necessarily true
c. the operator that indicates that the expression it modifies is true in all possible worlds.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Apparently, the Supreme Court invoked the law of necessity to rule that the full court could hear the appeal even if this would be in violation of the most fundamental principle of justice that requires a trial before an independent and impartial tribunal.
Back home in Nigeria, the doctrine of necessity was applied for the very first time on 9th February, 2010 wherein the joint session of the National Assembly passed a resolution making Vice President Goodluck Jonathan, the Acting President and Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of the Federal Republic of Nigeria.
Easements of Necessity. Another method of creation all states have in common is the easement by necessity.
In the realm of necessity there is no freedom, because freedom belongs only to those who are not desperate.
[section]704.01 provides for two distinct easements by way of necessity, an implied grant of necessity pursuant to subsection (1), which is, essentially, a codification of the implied way of necessity arising under common law when a common grantor conveys property in a manner that creates a "landlocked" parcel of property, and a statutory way of necessity pursuant to subsection (2).
In the emergency-destruction context, a natural name for this sort of necessity is "destruction necessity." (62) Showing the presence of destruction necessity answers the question of whether the destruction was permissible, but it does not answer every relevant question.
Households sought to maintain, to the best of their abilities, their consumption of necessity items while sacrificing luxury items, during and following the economic downturn.
In their introduction, the authors consider that the concept of necessity "is often the key element that drives the outcome of the analysis", whether it be with respect to individual self-defence under national criminal law, national self-defence under international law or killing during armed conflict (p 1).
von Eschenbach "beg[an], as [] in all due process cases, by examining our Nation's history, legal traditions, and practices." (108) Highly relevant in this determination was two common law doctrines, "the doctrine of necessity [and] the tort of intentional interference with rescue;" (109) i.e., necessity and Prevented Rescue.
In 1977, the Court seemed in fact to have suggested that the door to recognition of necessity jurisdiction was ajar.
The "Essentially Similar" Defences of Necessity, Self-Defence and Duress A.