off-side rule


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off-side rule

A lexical convention due to Landin, allowing the scope of declarations in a program to be expressed by indentation. Any non-whitespace token to the left of the first such token on the previous line is taken to be the start of a new declaration. Used in, for example, Miranda and Haskell.

[P.J. Landin "The Next 700 Programming Languages", CACM vol 9 pp157-165, March 1966]
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You can't organise a football game if one team decides unilaterally to opt out of the off-side rule.
I've been told he should have an agent, that he's a 'Messi in the making', that the fact he is two-footed and doesn't look at the ball when he dribbles is terribly advanced for his years, all by dads who know stuff and almost certainly haven't had the off-side rule explained to them 42 times until their eyes glazed over and are still none the wiser.
I have explained the rules of the game but the off-side rule is hard to get.
It shows you how messed up the off-side rule is because if the referee doesn't know the rules what chance have we all got?
Some lessons on the off-side rule in football are a must.
I watched the football match on Tuesday night, not because I'm a keen fan (and no, before you ask, I don't know how the off-side rule works) but it was my way of showing support.
I hate the off-side rule because so many officials get it wrong eg.
I know the off-side rule, I could tell you the difference between a direct and an indirect free kick and I actually felt like crying when Aaron Ramsey scored the winning FA Cup goal for Arsenal, my boy's favourite team.
Before you know what you are doing, you will be thinking three-four moves in advance, plotting and planning passes and shuffling players around even as another player controls the ball - incidentally, the off-side rule is implemented strictly so you cannot just plant one of your players a few feet from goal and bunt the ball to him.
There is no off-side rule and the football has ball bearings inside so the players can hear it.
No official score is kept of the goals which a team scores, and there is no off-side rule in force.
The was an impressive result from the team with defenders Marcus Elliot, George Marsden and George Walker stopping most attacks and playing the off-side rule with great affect and Oliver Taylor, Joe Thomas, Oliver Binks and Jack Swallow causing problems all over the pitch with their attacking play - and not to mention Liam Atkinson, who made several good saves to keep a well deserved clean sheet.