offence

(redirected from offense)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to offense: No offense meant, take offense

offence

(US), offense
American football
a. the team that has possession of the ball
b. the members of a team that play in such circumstances
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 3--Offenses, Known Offender's Race, by Offense Type, 2012
The expanded offense data include trends in both crime volume and crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants.
Article 79 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) provides the basic rule for lesser included offenses (LIOs): "An accused may be found guilty of an offense necessarily included in the offense charged or of an attempt to commit either the offense charged or an offense necessarily included therein.
Among the resolutions will be one setting the fines for illegal fireworks, illegal dumping and graffiti at $2,500 for a first offense, $5,000 for a second offense and $10,000 for a third offense within three years, City Attorney Matt Ditzhazy said.
As a football contractor, he has put together a very imposing structure that he calls Coaching a Winged-T Based Multiple Offense that even Shaughnessy, Jones, and Halas would have envied.
A conspiracy to commit an offense against the United States, which means a conspiracy to violate another federal criminal statute
In addition to duplicating state law, Congress has created derivative offenses, such as racketeering and mall fraud, an approach that makes convictions easier to obtain because the offense consists mainly of otherwise innocuous behavior.
The line graph shows the average size of the prison population according to the type of criminal offense.
Aggravated assault, which is the most frequently occurring violent crime in the Index, was the only violent offense to show a decrease from the 2000 volume--1.
Child welfare reformers, writing about the conditions in which adolescents grew up in turn-of-the-century cities, regularly characterized the police as all-too-eager to discipline teenagers for any offense, major or minor.
By age 30, 14 percent of mentally retarded women living independently and 6 percent of nonretarded women had committed at least one registered offense.
Under this law, an individual will be deemed to have a "disqualifying criminal offense" if the individual has been convicted of any one of 28 criminal offenses within the past 10 years.