offertory

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offertory

[Lat.,=offering], in the Roman Catholic MassMass,
religious service of the Roman Catholic Church, which has as its central act the performance of the sacrament of the Eucharist. It is based on the ancient Latin liturgy of the city of Rome, now used in most, but not all, Roman Catholic churches. The term Mass [Lat.
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 and in derived liturgical forms, the preparation of bread and wine on the altar and their formal offering to God. It takes place after the gospel and the creed and before the preface. A short psalm verse from Scriptures is appointed to be said or sung at the beginning; it varies from day to day. This is called the offertory verse. From ancient times it has been customary to collect the alms of the worshipers about the time of the offertory, hence the term has been transferred to the collection taken up in services in Protestant churches and to the music played or sung during the collection. The choice of this selection is usually left to the musicians of the church, and in many Protestant churches the offertory is the choir's principal musical selection in the service.

offertory

1. the oblation of the bread and wine at the Eucharist
2. the offerings of the worshippers at this service
3. the prayers said or sung while the worshippers' offerings are being received
References in periodicals archive ?
111-20) presents in overview the similarities between the Gregorian and Roman offertories and shows that the degree of resemblance corresponds to their placement in the liturgical calendar.
In chapter 4 Maloy examines the Milanese counterparts to the Roman and Gregorian offertories to observe the influence of the Italianate melodic style.
Maloy proposes that a full repertory of offertories was already in place in Rome by the beginning of the seventh century, probably a mix of indigenous and imported pieces.
The musical analysis of the offertories is based on a critical edition of ninety-four chants that are available at a companion Web site (www.