officious

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Related to officiously: typically, truculently

officious

Diplomacy informal or unofficial
References in classic literature ?
She told him that she came, though a stranger, with a single design of doing him a service and he should find she had no other end in it; that as she came purely on so friendly an account, she begged promise from him, that if he did not accept what she should officiously propose he would not take it ill that she meddled with what was not her business.
A negro lad, startled from his sleep by the officer's voice - he knows it well - but comforted by his assurance that he has not come on business, officiously bestirs himself to light a candle.
He has some nonsense that he calls his prayers, sir,' returned old John, officiously.
Mann ushered the beadle into a small parlour with a brick floor; placed a seat for him; and officiously deposited his cocked hat and can on the table before him.
Having officiously deposited the gentleman's boots right and left at his feet, and the lady's shoes right and left at hers, he backed towards the door.
Once again, I am reminded of that old saying: Thou shalt not kill but need not strive, officiously, to keep alive.
huffed Ian, "I was told officiously that I needed a customer number beginning with a letter.
Always happy to be seen making a big thing of the little things, such as officiously making a point of ordering a player to go back two more yards before he could take a simple free-kick deep in his own half.
Jane Austen's Emma Woodhouse officiously tries to further the interests of her young friend Harriet Smith, and Sara Crewe of Francis Hodgson Burnett's A Little Princess befriends the school dunce, a kitchen maid, and a rat who lives in her garret.
While I was being officiously treated no action was taken against the noisy, drunken hordes in the Tattersalls grandstand who (as usual at Chepstow) were spoiling any serious racegoer's enjoyment.
The Crofts then rush officiously about the house as they attempt to create privacy for the lovers.
Wordsworth draws on a Milton sonnet that was distinctly representative of and officiously embedded in a complex intertextual and public controversy debating the legality and ethics of divorce.