offshore current

offshore current

[′ȯf¦shȯr ′kə·rənt]
(oceanography)
A prevailing nontidal current usually setting parallel to the shore outside the surf zone.
Any current flowing away from shore.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"He got caught in an offshore current and it was a shock to see how quickly he was being swept out.
The design dimensions are optimized to ensure uncompromised uplift while effectively eliminating riser motions and higher levels of drag in onerous offshore current environments compared to traditional riser buoyancy.
Dolphin also will be feeding along the offshore bluewater weedlines this month and there will still be some large blackfin tuna to target at first light and late in the afternoons along any offshore current rip.
The data can be used in combination with satellite, numerical model and in situ measurements, offering better understanding of offshore current features and enhancing operational planning.
More than half are based in Britain, more specifically, 4,388 people holding Au699 million (e1/4872m) in offshore current accounts.
"The list identifies 4,388 people holding [pounds sterling]699 million in offshore current accounts and they are also likely to have billions of pounds more in investment schemes.
The list identifies 4,388 people holding 699 million pounds in offshore current accounts and they are also likely to have billions of pounds more in investment schemes.
The coroner's narrative verdict reads: "Sarah Louise Roberts, who couldn't swim, was swept out of her depth by an offshore current and drowned off Llanddwyn Island, Newborough Beach."
Some people mistakenly call this an undertow, but there's no undercurrent, just an offshore current. If you're caught in a rip current, don't fight it by trying to swim directly to shore.
The new sea level measurements will provide a better context for studying the interplay between offshore currents and coastal sea levels, he says.
Richard Wayne Morgan Surprised that fast flowing offshore currents round headlands (for which Wales is notorious) are not to be harnessed.

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