oil separator


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oil separator

[′ȯil ‚sep·ə‚rād·ər]
(petroleum engineering)

Oil Separator

 

a device for separating lubricating oil from compressed gas or exhaust water vapor. An oil separator is an element of most gas (vapor) compression and transfer installations. A similar device, which is used in compressor plants for trapping oil and water, is called a water and oil separator.

The operation of an oil separator is based mainly on the use of the difference in the values of the inertial forces (primarily centrifugal forces) acting on drops of oil and the considerably less dense particles of their gaseous environment. Cyclone oil separators are the most common. Oil separators collect up to 70-95 percent of the liquid impurities; oil separators with metal-ceramic liners, which facilitate coalescence of the drops (formation of a mist), collect up to 99.7 percent.

REFERENCE

FrenkeF, M. I. Porshnevye kompressory, 3rd ed. Leningrad, 1969.

oil separator

In a refrigeration system, a device for separating oil and oil vapor from the refrigerant, usually installed in the compressor discharge line.

oil separator

A device used to separate oil from the discharged air from the crankcase vent. It consists of a series of baffles over which discharged air from the vent passes. The oil sticks to the baffles and drains to the bottom of the separator housing and returns to the crankcase. The air rises above the baffles and leaves through a connection provided for this purpose. A deaerator is also a type of oil separator. See deaerator tray/chamber.
References in periodicals archive ?
The results show that particle size distributions are greatly influenced by engine speed and load conditions, as well as by the absence, presence, and type of oil separator. The effects of the oil separator on particle size are due to both the separator technology and to dimensions specific to the separator.
The oil cooling heat exchanger receives return hot oil from the screw compressor's oil separator at a temperature near the compressor's discharge temperature (~185[degrees]F for a high stage ammonia machine) and rejects its heat to a high pressure refrigerant stream flowing through the tube-side to reduce the oil to a desired supply temperature (~130[degrees]F) before being delivered back into the compressor.
* Periodically replaced Oil Separators, Oil and Air Filters for all Compressors.