old lady


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Idioms, Wikipedia.

old lady

a large noctuid moth, Mormo maura, that has drab patterned wings originally thought to resemble an elderly Victorian lady's shawl
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
'Ah!' said the old lady, shaking her head; 'I can't hear you.'
'Save us!' said the old lady, with tears in her eyes.
And Karen believed all this happened on account of the red shoes, but the old lady thought they were horrible, and they were burnt.
'Oh you naughty Whisker,' said the old lady. 'Fie upon you!
'I say, every morning of my life, that you'll do it at last, Sept,' remarked the old lady, looking on; 'and so you will.'
"And how are YOU, Grandmother?" replied Polina, as she approached the old lady. "Were you long on the journey?".
"Suppose the old lady doesn't come to," Rawdon said to his little wife, as they sate together in the snug little Brompton lodgings.
Polly rose at once, and remained standing till the old lady passed on.
They could hear the old lady's tongue clack as steadily as a rice-husker.
But every night he says to me: "Better and better, old lady. What did we say of her?
Richard and Ada, and Miss Jellyby, and the little old lady had gone by him, and I was going when he touched me on the arm to stay me, and chalked the letter J upon the wall--in a very curious manner, beginning with the end of the letter and shaping it backward.
Malicorne is a prince in disguise," replied the old lady, "he is all-powerful, seemingly."