oleate

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oleate

[′ō·lē‚āt]
(organic chemistry)
Salt made up of a metal or alkaloid with oleic acid; used for external medicines and in soaps and paints.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Figure 1: Infrared spectroscopy absorbance of solid (a) and liquid oleate (b) [14, 28]; (c) Thermogravimetric analysis of the Fe oleates (solid and liquid) under different conditions; (d) X-ray diffraction pattern for solid iron oleate.
For standardization purpose, a unique precursor that is a solid iron oleate, easy to prepare in large quantities, modified from Patent US number 20130089740 [13], easy to handle, and stable for long storage times was used for the first time and properly characterized in comparison to the liquid oleate, traditionally used in the thermal decomposition process [14].
The CTH of sunflower oil using limonene as hydrogen solvent donor was efficient for the production of oleates. For the production of more oleates with low of trans isomer content, optimal experimental conditions consisted of 0.5 to 1% Pd/C for 1 h using a 1:3 oil-limonene ratio.
Some evidence on oleate isomerization was obtained, but the influence of the catalyst and hydrogen donor solvent on isomerization will be a subject for future work.
SIZING PERFORMANCE AND HYDROLYSIS RESISTANCE OF ALKYL OLEATE SUCCINIC ANHYDRIDES
APPLICATION: With a long useful life in the emulsion form, ethyl oleate succinic anhydride could become one of the preferred sizing chemicals in papermaking.
At 45% SAA modification, the oleates based on soybean, linseed, and coconut oil have ambient viscosities between 10,000 and 20,000 cps except for the SAA-103 coconut oleate with a viscosity of 52,000 cps.
At 45% SAA modification, OH numbers are 94 for the oleates based on SAA-100 and 54 for the oleates based on SAA-103.
HSA (essentially fatty acid-free) was purchased from Sigma Chemical Co., as were oleate, linoleate, and stearate.
Among fatty acids, oleate is a most abundant in human serum; linoleate and stearate are also present in substantial amounts.