oleomargarine


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oleomargarine:

see margarinemargarine,
manufactured substitute for butter. It consists of a blend of vegetable oils or meat fats (or a combination of both) mixed with milk and salt. It was developed in the late 1860s by the French chemist Hippolyte Mège-Mouries in a contest sponsored by Napoleon III
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Purloining of Prince Oleomargarine is a story about a poor boy named Johnny who obtains a magical seed.
as Steenbock stated himself in testimony, oleomargarine was so important
Our distasteful story begins back in 1869, when a French chemist named Hippolyte Mege-Mouries invented an affordable butter substitute called oleomargarine. By using vegetable oil instead of milkfat, he created a cheap, butter-like substance that proved surprisingly popular with French eaters.
1885) (invalidating a statute which prohibited the manufacture or sale of oleomargarine); In re Application of Jacobs, 98 N.Y.
Butter is adulterated to an enormous extent with oleomargarine, a product of beef fat.
In that case, the IRS assessed a ten-cent per pound back tax on Southern Nut Product, a vegetable-based spread, under the Oleomargarine Act of 1886.
The second example is a class of criminal cases that involve the oleomargarine tax.
(42) A particularly interesting article of both special taxation and focused spatial control was oleomargarine. Although now considered an entirely unremarkable product, it was once the focus of great controversy and has been described as "an ill-treated child of the law." (43) For a long time it was not even called by its actual name as a form of control and disapprobation.
In the meat-packing industry at the turn of the twentieth century, for example, by-products included glue, fertilizer, soap, and oleomargarine, to name a few.
In the same year, the Oleomargarine Act required prominent labeling of colored oleomargarine, to distinguish it from butter.
The capital of the United States is crammed with these gentlemen, including one who looks out for the interest of the mayonnaise industry, another whose life is devoted to making yellow oleomargarine legal, and hundreds of others, including some whose motives to date, are mysteries.
The men's observations and interplay range from the banal to the profound as they cover love, sex, life, mortality, the Iraq War, and, among other non sequiturs, oleomargarine, Tarzan, hemp soap suppositories, and questions about flying dogs and the ghosts of Julia Child and Crazy Horse.