esthesioneuroblastoma

(redirected from olfactory neuroblastoma)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

esthesioneuroblastoma

[es¦thē·zē·ō¦nu̇r·ō‚bla′stō·mə]
(medicine)
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The differential diagnosis of SNUC primarily includes poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, high-grade/poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, olfactory neuroblastoma (high-grade), small cell undifferentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC), mucosal malignant melanoma, nasal-type natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma.
Olfactory neuroblastoma (ONB) is a malignant neoplasm thought to arise from the olfactory membrane of the sinonasal tract.
The differential diagnosis of SNTCS includes olfactory neuroblastoma, neuroendocrine carcinoma/small-cell carcinoma, sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, malignant salivary-gland-type tumors, adenocarcinoma, and metastatic teratoma.
The second opinion was that the specimens represented an invasive, poorly differentiated NEC, probably a large-cell variant, with the differential diagnosis lying at a point somewhere between poorly differentiated large-cell NEC and high-grade olfactory neuroblastoma.
In this way, we were able to distinguish sinonasal NEC from olfactory neuroblastoma and sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma; all three are neuroectodermal tumors.
One of the characteristic radiographic findings of olfactory neuroblastoma is a dumbbell-shaped mass that extends across the cribriform plate; erosion of the cribriform plate, lamina papyracea, and/or fovea ethmoidalis may also be seen.
Olfactory neuroblastomas are graded I through IV on the basis of the degree of differentiation and the presence or absence of a neural stroma, mitotic figures, and necrosis.
In this article, we report a new case of olfactory neuroblastoma.
Ghaffar and Salahuddin cite a source stating that, currently, the gold standard for the management of olfactory neuroblastoma is:
1) Esthesioneuroblastoma, also known as olfactory neuroblastoma, (2-4) has been confused with other tumors, such as inverting papilloma or benign nasal polyps.