omphalitis


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.

omphalitis

[‚äm·fə′līd·əs]
(medicine)
Inflammation of the umbilicus.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Severe congenital neutropenia often manifests with clinical manifestations of omphalitis, abscess formation, otitis media, gingivitis and pneumonia within the first six months after birth (1,2,4).
Poisson regression models and Cox survival regression models were used to compare neonatal mortality and umbilical stump infection (omphalitis) across groups.
Umbilical discharge can be the result of acquired pathologies, such as pilonidal sinus of umbilicus (suggested as the most common cause in one study), acute omphalitis [5], or congenital anomalies [6], but eccrine nevus and its variants have never been reported as a cause of umbilical discharge.
Bhutta, "Topical application of chlorhexidine to neonatal umbilical cords for prevention of omphalitis and neonatal mortality in a rural district of Pakistan: a community-based, cluster-randomised trial," The Lancet, vol.
As in foals, omphalitis often accompanies patent urachus and is believed to be involved in its pathogenesis.
Pneumonia ranked second (8.6%), followed by omphalitis (4.3%), surgical site infection (2.4%) and impetigo (1.2%).
(24) Umbilical cord infections such as omphalitis or tetanus neonatorum are more common in developing countries than high-income countries.
One was a 17-day-old infant who developed neonatal toxic omphalitis and died despite aggressive treatment that included multiple debridements and broad-spectrum antibiotics.
(9) Extrapelvic infectious and inflammatory conditions were also noted: extensive skin infections with omphalitis, (10) infected urachal remnant, (11) and hypersensitivity to chromate catgut sutures.
The most characteristic clinical finding is recurrent, severe bacterial infections beginning from birth, such as abscesses of perirectal skin or liver, omphalitis, otitis media, and upper and lower respiratory tract infections, caused by common or uncommon bacterial agents [3,4].
Uncommon manifestations included desquamation 8.5%, omphalitis 8% and birth trauma (7.7%).