omphalomesenteric duct


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Related to omphalomesenteric duct: omphalocele, Meckel's diverticulum, urachus

omphalomesenteric duct

[¦äm·fə·lō‚mez·ən′ter·ik ′dəkt]
(embryology)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Also, in the present case, an association of chorangiosis with a multiple vessel umbilical cord, having 5 blood vessels with an omphalomesenteric duct remnant was identified.
Patent omphalomesenteric duct (yellow arrow, Figure 2) with prolapse of both proximal and distal segments of adjacent terminal ileum were noted.
[8] Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital abnormality of the small intestine and it is caused by an incomplete obliteration of the omphalomesenteric duct. Although, Meckel's diverticulum generally remains silent but life-threatening complications may arise making it an important structure for having a detailed knowledge of its anatomical and pathophysiological properties to deal with such complications.
Meckel's diverticulum is the result of incomplete obliteration of the vitelline or omphalomesenteric duct and is the commonest congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal system [3].
KEY WORDS: Omphalomesenteric duct remnants, Omphalocele, Omphalomesenteric duct cyst, Newborn.
A peri-umbilical incision was made, and a 3 cm length of distal ileum that had prolapsed through a patent omphalomesenteric duct was reduced (Fig.
When it persists it can result in a number of diverse anomalies like entero-umbilical fistula, umbilical sinus, persistent fibrous cord, mesodiverticular vascular band, omphalomesenteric duct cyst, strawberry umbilical tumor.
Meckels diverticulum is a persistent remnant of the omphalomesenteric duct. It presents the most common congenital anomaly of the small intestine (1-4%).
DISCUSSION: Though the first recorded observation of an ileal diverticulum has been attributed to Fabricius Hildamus in 1650, Littre reported its presence in a hernia in 1745 and Meckel first described its association with the omphalomesenteric duct. The omphalomesenteric duct connects the yolk sac to the intestinal tract during early fetal life.
Omphalomesenteric duct remnants: Omphalomesenteric Duct connects yolk sac with apex of intestinal loop and becomes obliterated by 10th week of embryonic life.