oncomouse


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oncomouse

[′äŋk·ə‚mau̇s]
(biology)
A laboratory mouse that carries activated human cancer genes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
1, 4-5 (2005) (noting that the Supreme Court of Canada held that the oncomouse was not patentable subject matter because it was a "higher life form," not an article of "manufacture" or "composition of matter" even though the United States, Japan, and the EU had granted Harvard University patents for the transgenic mouse).
her coauthors have shown in connection with the oncomouse, which is used
In her critical work on the patented OncoMouse for cancer research, Donna Haraway reads patent law as a hybrid network.
Patenting life was taken a step further in 1984, when Harvard University successfully applied for a patent on its "oncomouse," a laboratory mouse specifically designed to get cancer easily, so that it would be more useful as a research tool.
Most notably, in 2002, a Supreme Court ruling on a cancer prone "oncomouse" (designed for cancer research) in Harvard College v.
(11) Similarly, scientific researchers who use mice in studying illness were angered when DuPont, which had an exclusive patent license for a genetically engineered mouse (Oncomouse), charged what they deemed an excessive price for the mouse and also imposed unusually restrictive conditions for sharing among researchers.
(3) There are numerous examples of validity challenges launched by noncompetitors, the most notable being that of the "Oncomouse" patent, which has been described as "one of the most valuable pieces of intellectual property ever created" (Jaffe 2004, p.
(1.) Donna Haraway, Modest_Witness@Second_Millennium.FemaleMan[C]_Meets_ Oncomouse [TM] Feminism and Technoscience (New York: Routledge, 1997).
An example of a development in biotechnology resulting in legal ramifications is the invention of a new life form called the oncomouse or the Harvard mouse.
Oncomouse case provides an excellent example for comparison of the U.S.