one-point perspective

one-point perspective

[′wən ‚pȯint pər′spek·tiv]
(graphic arts)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

one-point perspective

A rendition of an object with a principal face parallel to the picture plane; all horizontal lines parallel to the picture plane remain as is, and all other horizontal lines converge to a preselected vanishing point.
See also: Perspective projection
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
The chapter on one-point perspective includes convenient instruction on finding the center of a window or door, and how to draw a receding series of them, too.
Five of his gimmicky if implicitly cubist photographic collages beginning around 1982 signal his release from the confines of one-point perspective. The photocollages form something of a gateway to the show's last three exuberant galleries and the expansive landscapes, interiors and, most recently, views of the intensely blue wraparound terrace above the pool and garden of Hockney's Los Angeles home.
In Renaissance painting, one-point perspective allowed a temporal unfolding of a spiritual moment; distance between foreground, middle ground, and background could delineate the passage of time.
The construction of one-point perspective was later described in the treatise "On Painting" by Leon Battista Alberti, published in 1435-1436 (3).
They argue, "while the position of the animation camera implies at any moment a version of one-point perspective, the mobility imparted to this viewing position generates a sense of multiple perspectives, implying a radical perspectivalism"(182).
At the end of the light arch sequence, a "Schindler red" wall or door ends the visual one-point perspective. This creates an illusion that the space is moving forward or displacing, recalling the effect of elevators to displace or move one's horizon.
During the Quattrocento, the use of continuous narrative--the inclusion of more than one moment in a single scene or picture--became quite prevalent, even after the introduction of one-point perspective. By the end of the Cinquecento this was no longer the case, and the continuous method was largely set aside, at least for most easel paintings.
As the film helpfully explains, Shulman's eye for one-point perspective (though not noted here, a considerable influence on Stanley Kubrick's films from "Paths of Glory" on) accommodated the style's emphasis on open, airy space; long, geometrical lines; panoramic use of glass and windows; and the visual blending of exterior earth and sky with interior comfort zones.
Yet, such is the power of visual learning that we persist in comprehending the photograph in traditional one-point perspective, as if Zanela were somehow standing in front of the vanishing point.
I suggest that you start students with one-point perspective and then introduce the more complex two-point approach.
The image and his anonymity are a metaphor: a one-point perspective on an unclear horizon for each migrant who won't look back.
With the other hand he lifts a red damask curtain to display his new museum of natural history--the first of its kind--lying beyond this portal, its multi-tiered displays receding in dramatic one-point perspective. The painting's message is, as I see it, Welcome to what I've collected.