one-point perspective

one-point perspective

[′wən ‚pȯint pər′spek·tiv]
(graphic arts)

one-point perspective

A rendition of an object with a principal face parallel to the picture plane; all horizontal lines parallel to the picture plane remain as is, and all other horizontal lines converge to a preselected vanishing point.
See also: Perspective projection
References in periodicals archive ?
Five of his gimmicky if implicitly cubist photographic collages beginning around 1982 signal his release from the confines of one-point perspective.
While the painting seems complicated due to the large number of active people in a relatively small room, Steen uses simple one-point perspective, with the vanishing point converging on the boy standing on top of the table.
Louver, Hockney turned his attention to photographic postproduction digital editing, aiming to challenge what he has criticized as photography's warped realism, beholden as the camera is to one-point perspective.
The construction of one-point perspective was later described in the treatise "On Painting" by Leon Battista Alberti, published in 1435-1436 (3).
They argue, "while the position of the animation camera implies at any moment a version of one-point perspective, the mobility imparted to this viewing position generates a sense of multiple perspectives, implying a radical perspectivalism"(182).
At the end of the light arch sequence, a "Schindler red" wall or door ends the visual one-point perspective.
During the Quattrocento, the use of continuous narrative--the inclusion of more than one moment in a single scene or picture--became quite prevalent, even after the introduction of one-point perspective.
As the film helpfully explains, Shulman's eye for one-point perspective (though not noted here, a considerable influence on Stanley Kubrick's films from "Paths of Glory" on) accommodated the style's emphasis on open, airy space; long, geometrical lines; panoramic use of glass and windows; and the visual blending of exterior earth and sky with interior comfort zones.
Yet, such is the power of visual learning that we persist in comprehending the photograph in traditional one-point perspective, as if Zanela were somehow standing in front of the vanishing point.
I suggest that you start students with one-point perspective and then introduce the more complex two-point approach.
The image and his anonymity are a metaphor: a one-point perspective on an unclear horizon for each migrant who won't look back.
With the other hand he lifts a red damask curtain to display his new museum of natural history--the first of its kind--lying beyond this portal, its multi-tiered displays receding in dramatic one-point perspective.