onomatopoeia


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onomatopoeia

(ŏn'əmăt'əpē`ə) [Gr.,=word-making], in language, the representation of a sound by an imitation thereof; e.g., the cat mews. Poets often convey the meaning of a verse through its very sound. For example, in "Song of the Lotus-Eaters" Tennyson indicates the slow, sensuous, and langorous life of the Lotus-Eaters by the sound of the words he uses to describe the land in which they live:
Here are cool mosses deep,
And through the moss the ivies creep,
And in the stream the long-leaved flowers weep,
And from the craggy ledge the poppy hangs in sleep.
Onomatopoeia can also represent harsh and unpleasant sounds, as in Browning's "Meeting at Night":
A tap at the pane, the quick sharp scratch
And blue spurt of a lighted match.

Onomatopoeia

(pop culture)
The black trench coat–wearing assassin Onomatopoeia hurled onto the pages of a Kevin Smith–penned, Phil Hester and Ande Parks–illustrated story in Green Arrow vol. 3 #11 (2002). Introduced as a ninja-like murderer of third-string superheroes such as the suburban vigilante Buckeye, Onomatopoeia struck a more well-known superhero, the contemporary Green Arrow, Connor Hawke—an accomplished martial artist himself and son of the original Green Arrow, Oliver Queen. Like his name implies, Onomatopoeia's calling card is that he utters onomatopoeic words—specifically, the sound of the murder weapon he employs during the murder (“Bang!” “Crash!”)—just before killing his next victim. While he didn't quite execute Green Arrow, he did manage to hospitalize him by shooting him in the head. As Green Arrow's arch-nemesis—and by extension, his father's, as the two Emerald Archers fight crime together in Star City—little is known about this evasive, verbally limited supervillain. His face concealed behind a black mask with concentric bull's-eye markings, Onomatopoeia has superpowers that mimic a super–serial killer. He is adept at using guns, swords, knives, and other weaponry, and even goes to such extremes as to bite weapons in two! With behavior that borders on psychotic, the mysterious Onomatopoeia might find a welcome home in the bleaker post–Infinite Crisis (2005–2006) DC Universe.

Onomatopoeia

 

in linguistics, sound-imitative words that develop out of a phonetic similarity to combinations of nonverbal sounds—for example, Russian miaukat’, “to meow” (from miau, “meow”). The term “onomatopoeia” also refers to the method by which sound-imitative words are formed, as well as to a particular type of onomatopoeic, or reduplicative, word. Often, “onomatopoeia” designates the conventional verbal imitation of the sound associated with a living or nonliving thing (ku-ku, “cuckoo”; bum-bum, “boom-boom”; a devitsa—khi-khi-khi! da kha-kha-kha! “And the girl goes ‘Hee, hee, hee!’ and ‘Ha, ha, ha!’ “). Onomatopoeia is used in poetry to create an image based on sound:

Budu akat’, budu okat’,
Kapliu-step’ voz’mu pod lokot’,
Kon’ poidet podkovoi tsokat’,
Ekat’ selezenkoiu. (A. Tarkovskii) 

onomatopoeia

1. the formation of words whose sound is imitative of the sound of the noise or action designated, such as hiss, buzz, and bang
2. the use of such words for poetic or rhetorical effect
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References in periodicals archive ?
Kaze no Matasaburo (Matasaburo of the Wind/Matasaburo The Wind Imp) begins with a song in which the Japanese onomatopoeia doddodo aoao-do dodo depicts the sound of a strong wind that immediately introduces the reader to the theme of the story.
Asked if onomatopoeia had too many letters for him, he replied: "About nine too many.
Onomatopoeia becomes for Clare a model for the power of sound in poetry, generating techniques for blending the sounds of the natural world and those of his own words into a single utterance whose direct appeal to the reader's sense of hearing will partake of the force of the original.
Both "ooeeehah" and "wayawayawayawayaway" are examples of nonlexical onomatopoeia that indicate Stephen is testing vowel sounds for his poem.
The role of onomatopoeia is important to Weiss's story as it stresses the voice as medium and not simply as message, however much its role in literature designates a more secure place in history.
Using onomatopoeia (words that imitate sounds), people have figured out ways to express these sounds in many different languages.
Those that could be used to describe the musical examples in the data provided by the respondents have been identified as analogy, imagery, metaphor, onomatopoeia and simile.
The words squishy, fabulous, cool and onomatopoeia - a word which imitates the sound it is describing - completed the top 10.
PUYO' is a Japanese onomatopoeia that expresses the sensation of touching the vehicle's soft body.
Dad, can you give examples of Coleridge's use of onomatopoeia in the same stanza?
To enjoy reading comics, Wolk suggests, you must appreciate the medium's offensive surprises, flagrant silliness, bad exclamatory writing, and burps of onomatopoeia.
Chapter 3 explores onomatopoeia, 'echoicness', and phonaesthemes, focused by an inspired simile: 'Words sharing an onomatopoeic combination of sounds are like children living in the same foster home at the same time: they form a close-knit group without being related to one another.