open stope

open stope

[′ō·pən ′stōp]
(mining engineering)
Underground working place that is unsupported, or supported by timbers or pillars of rock.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The waste rock is cemented with tailings filling into the open stope. At present, the method of exploiting a strip width of 5 m and leaving 5.5 m is used in the mine.
The company is also employing a new mining method to boost production levels by transitioning from large open stope blast hole mining to sub-level shrinkage (SLS), a variation of sub-level cave mining where waste fill will be introduced to the top of the cave.
NAM-033 and NAM-034 (Figure 3) were drilled below the previously reported NAM-008 (Press Release Aug 2011) which intersected an open stope at the target depth.
The report also highlights a conceptual mine plan combining open pit mining and sublevel, open stope underground mining.
The first of the short holes testing the upper portion of the deposit, LRGG-19-019, intersected the Los Ricos vein from 23.0m to 43.5m and encountered an open stope from 27.5 to 29.7m.
The goal of Baiden's team is far from a simple one: send a robot down a 1.5-kilometre ramp, turn a corner, and arrive at the edge of an open stope, where it would need to extend a robotic arm and fire off a laser scanner.
Open Stope Design at Normandy Golden Grove Operations
In massive open stoping areas, the sub-outcrop of the reefs coincides with reduced waste middling between the reefs, and this package of multiple, steep reefs lends itself to the creation of a large massive open stope. The stope shape has unsupported sloped sidewalls to improve safety and to channel the broken rock into the trough drive below.
The limiting of open stope strike length by introducing pillars minimises their effect on the stope stability.
This permits large scale open stope techniques to be used even when rock conditions are relatively poor, thereby allowing more selective, and therefore more productive, mining.