open-circuit potential

open-circuit potential

[′ō·pən ¦sər·kət pə′ten·chəl]
(physical chemistry)
Steady-state or equilibrium potential of an electrode in absence of external current flow to or from the electrode.
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The coated samples were then exposed to 5% aqueous NaCl solution, while the open-circuit potential ([E.sub.OCP]) was being recorded.
Furthermore, open-circuit potentials for the formulation containing H570 and H650 shifted to the more noble values as the inhibitor concentration increased, suggesting improved anticorrosion properties of the paint film when compared to the control paint with no inhibitors.
Open-circuit potential and DC polarization studies are principally directed to the more metallic coatings and their characteristics as electrodes.
Then, 1 [cm.sup.2] of the test panel was immersed in the corrosion medium to obtain an open-circuit potential before the start of evaluation.
The experimental part of this study was carried out using open-circuit potential (OCP), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and potentiodynamic polarization measurements.
The open-circuit potential (OCP) curves obtained for the steel electrode in sulfuric acid in the absence and presence of ATA were done for 60 min.
Open-circuit potential measurements were performed using electronic mulimeter (Type E scord-EDM 2116).
The variation of open-circuit potential values with time for chromate, filler material-containing and PANI-containing coatings in 0.1% and 0.5% NaCl is shown in Fig.
The DC potential applied during an EIS measurement on a coating is almost always the open-circuit potential. For a coated metal sample that is in excellent condition, it is difficult to obtain a stable value of the open-circuit potential.
The result is an apparent open-circuit potential that steadily increases until it reaches the limit of the potentiostat (8-30 volts).
The value of the open-circuit potential is then used during the EIS measurement and specified "versus the reference electrode." The open-circuit potential of most common metals is between -1.0 and 0.5 volts.
Flashlights, portable radios, and photo strobes operated from carbon-zinc batteries in a few cylindrical- and prismatic-package sizes with open-circuit potentials ranging from 1.5 to 510 V.