opposite

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opposite

1. Botany
a. (of leaves, flowers, etc.) arranged in pairs on either side of the stem
b. (of parts of a flower) arranged opposite the middle of another part
2. Maths
a. (of two vertices or sides in an even-sided polygon) separated by the same number of vertices or sides in both a clockwise and anticlockwise direction
b. (of a side in a triangle) facing a specified angle
3. Maths the side facing a specified angle in a right-angled triangle
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Opposite

 

one of the two “conflicting” aspects of a concrete unity that constitute the two sides of a contradiction. Opposites are classified as external or internal. External opposites appear as the poles of a contradiction that presuppose and simultaneously exclude one another and yet exist relatively independently, for example, the proletariat and the bourgeoisie. Internal opposites negate each other but nonetheless exist with mutual penetration, for instance, the social nature of production and the private capitalist mode of appropriation.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

opposite

[′äp·ə·zət]
(botany)
Located side by side.
Of leaves, being in pairs on an axis with each member separated from the other of the pair by half the circumference of the axis.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
My proposal is that the oppositeness of pleasure and pain can be explained by appeal to their value.
continental shelves was one of "oppositeness," rather than "adjacency."(172) According to seismic studies, the continental margins of both the United States and Mexico also approach each other from opposite sides of the Gulf of Mexico basin, and tend to merge in the middle of the Gulf.(173) If this is the case, then the Western Gap area is located in the exact area in which the continental shelves of the United States and Mexico merge.(174) Therefore, one could easily take the stance of Canada in the Gulf of Maine case and apply that principle to the case in the Gulf of Mexico.
(4.) Discussing the manifestation and distribution of the word and concept "heterosexuality" in early twentieth-century America, Jonathan Katz traces the discursive construction not only in terms of a binary relationship between hetero- and homosexuality but also in terms of the binary opposition between male and female: "The 'oppositeness' of the sexes was alleged to be the basis for a universal, normal, erotic attraction between males and females....The early twentieth-century focus on physiological and gender dimorphism reflected the deep anxieties of men about the shifting work, social roles, and power of men over women, and about the ideals of womanhood and manhood" (1990, 17).
Raskin explains that the two overlapping scripts are associated to the terms DOCTOR and LOVER, and that the "the two overlapping scripts are perceived as opposite in a certain sense, and that this oppositeness creates the joke" (1985: 100).
Since the difference ANGLE measures is independence, not oppositeness, of sound, it is perfectly fitting that its maximal value be 90[degress], representing perpendicularity, rather than 180[degrees], representing a negative direction.
(141.) Leonard Legault & Blair Hankey, Method, Oppositeness and Adjacency, and Proportionality in Maritime Boundary Delimitation, in INTERNATIONAL MARITIME BOUNDARIES, supra note 4, at 203, 206 [hereinafter Legault & Hankey].
(1991) suggested that on the basis of prior social training, Northern Irish participants who failed to form an equivalence class might have been responding in accordance to the relational frame of coordination (i.e., Protestant symbols with Protestant names), and those Northern Irish participants who passed might have been responding in accordance to the relational frame of oppositeness (i.e., Protestant symbols with Catholic names) (Steele, 1987).