opsonize

(redirected from opsonization)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to opsonization: Complement system

opsonize

[′äp·sə‚nīz]
(immunology)
To render microorganisms susceptible to phagocytosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Low levels of ATP secondary to hypophosphatemia increase the incidence of bacterial or fungal infections because of poor phagocytosis or opsonization.
It's possible that opsonization and phagocytosis of pneumococci are more effective in the bloodstream than in the lungs.
Over the past year, OBI has collaborated with an immunology consultant to develop a thorough preclinical immunocompetency plan to determine if Oxycyte adversely affects bacterial opsonization and immune competence to an infectious challenge.
These include destabilizing the structural integrity of the cytoskeleton by producing toxins, forming capsules to prevent opsonization and to resist degradation, lacking receptors (which triggers the host immune system), lacking substrate susceptible to lysozymes, and producing antioxidant compounds (which inhibit respiratory burst activity of the host).
Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is an important component of the immune defence able to bind to repeating mannose based structural patterns typical of microbial surface (bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites) leading to opsonization and phagocytosis, and activation of the complement pathway resulting in lysis of the pathogen.
A polymorphonuclear leukocyte was then added, and if sufficient antibodies in the patient's serum had bound to the nucleus, opsonization occurred.
Usually the organism is efficiently cleared by the monocyte-macrophage system after opsonization by antibody and complement.
In an in vitro opsonization assay, 14358 was opsonized by 336 specific immune rabbit IgGs and not by normal rabbit IgG.
This activity is akin to the process of opsonization in vertebrates, which involves antibodies as recognition molecules.
Deficiency of MBL was first identified in association with a common defect of opsonization in children.
14,15) A reduction in serum complement levels and a disturbed opsonization (endogenous antimicrobial activity), e ither related or not to the hypocomplementemia, has been described also, albeit not uniformly in patients with chronic liver disease.
Once bound, CRP is a powerful activator of the classic complement system and can promote opsonization and phagocytosis of foreign substances.