opt-in


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opt-in

To accept some situation or condition ahead of time. For example, to opt-in to an email campaign means that you agree to receive periodic newsletters or information, which may include advertising from the publisher or third parties. An opt-in program implies that you can cancel the service, or "opt-out." A lot of spam is sent out under the guise that, at one point, the user did opt-in for the program, which may or may not be true. See spam and bacn.
References in periodicals archive ?
Apple svp of software technology Bud Tribble--normally a vociferous privacy advocate--also rejects a default opt-in, saying opt-ins are "appropriate in many circumstances" but not all.
At the New York Times, 14 million subscribers have chosen to opt-in to one of their 50 and more e-newsletter titles, said Nicole Breskin, director of product management.
Some charities are playing it safe by moving toward an opt-in model for all communications, according to Fluskey.
Once you get an applicant to accept, confirm and then become students and eventually alumni, most universities will not need the opt-in. But you should absolutely let them opt out.
In an "opt-in" class, by contrast, a person within the scope of the class definition is by default not a class member unless she affirmatively joins the class.
Whether states decide on opt-outs with fees, opt-ins or another option, all will try to balance individual choice and customer concerns with grid reliability, utility costs and energy efficiency.
The first step is to review what percentage of members have signed opt-in forms.
Third, customers may prefer text messages versus email for offers and alerts, so if you plan to use both avenues, use cross-channel opt-ins so customers can select the vehicle they prefer.
Pop-up invitations to your newsletter have proved to increase opt-ins by 300 percent, Lussier says, but keep the number of fields the prospect fills in to the absolute minimum--just a first name and email address if possible.
If, for instance, 50 percent of opt-ins convert from one source but only 25 percent from another are proving to be engaged and qualified, it might shut off the second source to maximize resources.
Since adding an opt-in that asks users to click a box if they agree to accept cookies from ICO's site, only 10% of visitors have complied.
What we've seen in the last few months, though, are situations where banks with very high opt-in rates being scrutinized by their regulators, to see if marketing of the service went too far.