optical instrument

(redirected from optical device)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to optical device: Optical instruments

optical instrument

[′äp·tə·kəl ′in·strə·mənt]
(optics)
An optical system which acts on light in some desired way, such as to form a real or virtual image, to form an optical spectrum, or to produce light with a specified polarization or wavelength.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most of the known optical devices of augmented reality are based on a combination of eyepiece eyepieces to enlarge an image formed by LCDs, LCoSs, CRTs, OLEDs, or other spatial light modulators having compact size and image combiners are based on, for example, a beam-splitting cube or a semitransparent plate.
A diffractive optical device, holographic device or holographic optical element formed by means of the use of the method as defined in any one or more of Claims 1-26.
A technology leader in providing next-generation integrated optical devices for fiber optic communications, Kymata's 8-inch device enables a 130% increase of standard components on a wafer compared to 6-inch devices.
David Honey, General Manager Optical Devices said: "Fujifilm is delighted to have someone of David's extensive industry experience to strengthen our Optical Division and help us achieve our strategic objectives in developing our profile with cinematographers.
For silicon photonics-based optical transceiver technology, which holds significant promise for the next generation of high-performance supercomputers, optical devices are effectively limited to transmission speeds of 25 Gbps.
Sandhage has since teamed up with Hildebrand and researchers at Ohio State University in Columbus and the Air Force Research Laboratory in Dayton, Ohio, to turn diatoms into mass producers of new electronic and optical devices.
Indeed, a major Vermeer show last year in New York devoted a room to the optical devices to which Vermeer and other 17th-century painters had recourse.
This structure reduces the cost of devices in addition to increasing efficiency and performance of electro-optical and optical devices.
Tyler calls the idea that optics were used in the 1500s and earlier "just storytelling" Particularly galling, he and other critics say, is the absence of any clear evidence from that time that the optical devices available could produce the kind of images Hockney claims the masters used.
Focused on system applications and functions rather than specific optical devices and technologies, the POP allows rapid upgrades to newer optical components without large development efforts and component technology specific dependence or risk.