optical train

optical train

[′äp·tə·kəl ′trān]
(optics)
The series of lenses, mirrors, and prisms of an optical apparatus, such as a microscope or telescope, through which the light rays pass.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Made from UV-fused silica, PowerPhotonic's FM-SAC combines multiple functions in a single monolithic optic, increasing pump efficiency, shortening the optical train and reducing cost.
Hanley was responsible for the analysis of Bright Spot Backgrounds in the High Power Optical Train at HELSTF.
Requires an additional %-inch of back focus in your telescope's optical train.
Of course, with LEDs, the chip is just the starting point and one part of a whole system that also includes the heat sink, the driver and the optical train. Hershman noted that in the laboratory, LEDs have already achieved their theoretical cost-effective maximum efficacy for white light--somewhere between 260 and 300 lumens per watt, which means that within the next few years, the rate of efficacy increase will start to plateau.
The complexity and size of that reactor limited the ease in which it could be integrated into an optical train, making it impractical for use with a wide range of optical measurements.
The grants will see the company developing a novel intraoperative OCT system that will be consolidated directly into the optical train of the microscope.
The lens panels are combined with a Secondary Optical Element (SOE) to create a complete optical train package for assembly directly into Concentrated Photovoltaics (CPV) modules.
A selection of images of NGC 7008 received by the Section are included with this article (depending upon the optical train in the individual telescopes some images are flipped compared to others).
PLEX Corp/Wisconsin presented two final optical train concepts, one uses a Grazing Incidence Metal Mirror as a final optic, the other uses a dielectric mirror.
An optical train (14) and a Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) (Dantec, BSA-F50) were used for birefringenee and instantaneous local velocity measurements, respectively.
The major difference among TOF instruments is the axial or linear optical train where mass bias is minimalized vs the right angle or orthogonal optical train where there are slight resolution advantages but significant mass bias disadvantages.
The availability of a detector that responds directly to UV photons means drastic changes can be made to the AN/AAR-57's optical train, starting with the elimination of the current FOA, as well as the image intensifier (along with its high voltage power supply) and the CCD.

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