optical tweezers


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optical tweezers

[′äp·tə·kəl ′twēz·ərz]
(optics)
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The global Optical Tweezers (Mechanobiology) market was valued at $XX million in 2018, and analysts predict the global market size will reach $XX million by the end of 2028, growing at a CAGR of XX% between 2018 and 2028.
Optical tweezers serve as actual tweezers but on a microscopic scale.
supply and installation of a dual system of optical tweezers combined correlatively with confocal fluorescence microscopy and laminar microfluidic technology.
Half of the Nobel Prize was awarded to Arthur Ashkin for his work in creating a tool called Optical Tweezers.
Sweden's Royal Academy of Sciences said Ashkin's development of optical tweezers that can grab tiny particles such as viruses without damaging them realized "an old dream of science fiction," using the tiny amount of pressure exerted by beams of light to move objects.
Arthur Ashkin of the United States was awarded the Nobel for inventing optical tweezers, which use the radiation pressure of a tiny focused beam of light to trap very small objects.
A breakthrough came in 1987 when he used the new optical tweezers to grab living bacteria without harming them.
Dr Ashkin developed a laser technique described as optical tweezers, which is used to study biological systems.
BRUSSELS, Oct 2 (KUNA) -- The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm decided Tuesday to award the Nobel Prize in Physics 2018 to three scientists "for groundbreaking inventions in the field of laser physics." One half of the prize goes to Arthur Ashkin of the US "for the optical tweezers and their application to biological systems" and the other half jointly to Gerard Mourou of France and and Donna Strickland of Canada "for their method of generating high-intensity, ultra-short optical pulses", said the Academy in a press release.
Ashkin deserved one half of the prize "for the optical tweezers and their application to biological systems," as he invented optical tweezers that grab particles, atoms, and molecules with their laser beam fingers.
Ashkin, of Bell Laboratories in New Jersey, wins half of the prize for his development of "optical tweezers".
To date, a variety of testing techniques have been used to measure the viscoelastic mechanical properties of biological cells, for example, micropipette aspiration [1], atomic force microscopy [2], optical tweezers [3,4], and magnetic tweezers [5].

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