orbital plane


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Related to orbital plane: Orbital inclination

orbital plane

[′ȯr·bəd·əl ′plān]
(mechanics)
The plane which contains the orbit of a body or particle in a central force field; it passes through the center of force.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since the out-of-plane angles are zeros all through, the motion besides the orbital plane does not exist and the motion of system could be confined into orbital plane, which can simplify the dynamic equations and help analyze the deployment theoretically.
The elliptical orbit of Eris is tilted at an angle of 45 degrees to the orbital plane of the major planets.
We also saw hints of a second trend, which Konstantin Batygin and Michael Brown (both at Caltech) confirmed two years later in 2016: The orbital planes of the most extreme objects are also aligned in ecliptic longitude.
Today, Voyager 1 continues to travel upward of the planets orbital plane.
The ANDE satellites, orbiting beneath the ISS, provide important validation of the RAIDS density measurements made in the same orbital plane.
Unlike previous launches, where some satellites were sent drifting to their operational orbital plane, all 10 satellites from this launch will go directly into operation once testing is completed.
Caption: Artist's concept of two black holes about to merge, spinning on axes that are tilted with respect to their orbital plane.
That far out in the solar system, they should be pretty perpendicular to the average orbital plane around the sun, but a large object could put them on an angle.
Later, the white dwarf blows off a faster wind of particles moving mostly outward along the poles of the orbital plane.
It is possible that Earth's climate could respond to the unsteady orbital plane as well as to the kinds of astronomical twitches that preoccupied Milankovitch, he says.
All three [engine burns] were completed to within just a few tenths of a percent of the target thrust, resulting in the craft's orbital plane being off by just a few fractions of a degree, which is trivial.
Since the orbital plane of Venus is not exactly aligned with that of Earth, transits occur very rarely, in pairs eight years apart but separated by more than a century.