archil

(redirected from orcein)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

archil

(är`kĭl, –chĭl) or

orchil

(ôr`–), blue, red, or purple dye extracted from several species of lichenlichen
, usually slow-growing organism of simple structure, composed of fungi (see Fungi) and photosynthetic green algae or cyanobacteria living together in a symbiotic relationship and resulting in a structure that resembles neither constituent.
..... Click the link for more information.
, also called orchella weeds, found in various parts of the world. Commercial archil is either a powder (called cudbear), a pasty mass (called archil), or a drier paste (called persis).
References in periodicals archive ?
Nuclear maturation rate of mature and immature vitrified buffalo oocytes after staining with orcein stain (Mean S.
The dye, a compound called orcein, and a related substance, called O4, bind preferentially to small amyloid aggregates that are considered to be toxic and cause neuronal dysfunction and memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease.
The radicles were then hydrolysed with 5 N HCl for 5--15 min at room temperature stained with 2% acetic orcein and squashed.
Testicular follicles were squashed and stained with orcein and observed under light microscopy (Zeiss Standard, 40X).
Thin paraffin sections (5 [micro]m) were cut and stained with Haematoxylin and Eosin (Luna, 1968) for routine fibrocellular architecture, Van Gieson's stain (Luna) for collagen fibers, Gomori's reticulin method (Luna) for reticular fibers and Weigert's resorcin fuchsin and orcein (Luna) stain for elastic fibers.
For meiotic analysis, slides were prepared using the method of squashing the anthers and coloring with acetic orcein 2% (GUERRA & SOUZA, 2002).
Towards the end of 1970s, Tanner and associates modified the previous histochemical studies on ICC (23), and reported an increase of Orcein +ve stainable hepatic Copper binding protein (CuBP) (24).
Light microscope observations were done on temporary preparations obtained by overflowing anther content suspended in acetic orcein (1.
In the twentieth century, biologists found orcein to be a useful agent for staining chromosomes, enhancing their visibility under a microscope.
The onion root tips were fixed and lactic-acetic orcein squashes on microscope slides were made for cytogenetic study.