orchard


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

orchard,

generally an area on which fruit or nut trees are planted and cultivated. The words grove and plantation are often used when the fruits are tropical, e.g., a "citrus grove" or a "banana plantation." The distinction among the three terms arises from common usage rather than definition. The orchard of ancient times was a pleasure garden of formal design, often adorned with fountains and statuary. Today orchards are more commonly commercial ventures, sometimes covering many acres. Machinery is now often used for cultivating, spraying, picking, and packing. The ground beneath the trees may be kept clear, or cover crops may be grown, or the two practices may alternate. In young orchards it is usually possible to grow vegetables and berry fruits as cover crops in the rows between the trees, thus helping maintenance costs until the trees begin to bear.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Orchard

 

a plot of land occupied by perennial fruit plants. Mixed plantings of fruit and berry crops are often called orchards. In the USSR the following types of orchards are distinguished: kolkhoz, sovkhoz, collective, household, and school. The minimum size for commercial kolkhoz and sovkhoz orchards is 50 to 75 hectares (ha). A smaller area would not make possible the use of the necessary machines and would not make for efficient fruit growing. The productivity of a commercial orchard largely depends on its site. For example, elevated plains, lowlands, and cold slopes are unsuitable for orchards. In the central and northeastern European USSR, in parts of the Urals, and in Siberia, the most suitable areas for orchards are southern, southwestern, and western slopes that have grades of 5°–8° and are protected from prevailing winds. In southern regions, northern and northwestern slopes are used for orchards. Thermophile species, such as peaches and figs, are raised on southern slopes.

The best soils are those that are fertile, loose, and water permeable. Harmful salts, especially chlorides and sulfates, should be absent. The roots should penetrate the soil strata and seams easily. Nonsaline ground waters must be no closer than 2 m from the surface, and saline ground waters no closer than 3 m. In the central region of the European USSR the feeding area is 4 × 8 m or 6 × 8 m for apple and pear trees, 3 × 4 m or 4 × 4 m for cherry and plum trees, and 1.25–1.5 × 2.0–2.5 m for berry crops. In southern regions, trees are planted somewhat sparsely, and in northern locales, more densely. Orchards in a particular region are made up of species and varieties that have been regionalized for that locality. The land is divided into rectangles of 8–12 ha, between which roadways are made. Each rectangle should contain varieties that mature at the same time. In a commercial apple orchard, two or three summer and autumn varieties and three or four winter varieties are grown. When the orchard is planted, the pollinator varieties are selected. Usually four to six rows of the principal variety and one or two rows of the pollinator variety are planted. For each hectare of orchard there must be one to two beehives. In school, collective, and household orchards different species are grown in the same area. Two to three years before planting an orchard, shelterbelts and windbreak strips are planted.

Dead trees are replaced by seedlings. In young orchards, various crops are grown in the interrow spaces. A circular area around the base of the trees (with a diameter approximately 1.5 times greater than the diameter of the crown) is kept under autumn fallow. The soil is mulched with humus, peat, or peat-manure compost to a depth of 5–8 cm. Around the trunk of the trees the soil is cultivated to a radius of 0.4–0.8 m by hand or machine, and the remaining interrow areas are worked with an orchard cultivator, disk harrow, or shallow plow. The depth of cultivation around the trunk is 6–8 cm; further from the trunk the depth is 10–15 cm for drupes and 15–20 cm for pips. In young orchards, fertilizers are applied during autumn plowing. The doses are determined by the age of the tree and by soil and climatic conditions. Organic fertilizers are used once every two or three years. Feeding, mainly with nitrogenous fertilizers, is done in parts—in early spring and during shoot growth. In areas with insufficient moisture, young orchards are irrigated. Young tree trunks are protected during the winter from damage by rodents. Fruit trees are shaped, pruned, and, as they age, rejuvenated.

As the trees begin to bear fruit, the ground is kept autumn fallow in the first half of the vegetative period and under green manure in the second half. During autumn plowing, organic fertilizers (30–40 tons/ha of manure or compost) or a complete mineral fertilizer (with 120–240 kg of active substances) is applied. Early-spring harrowing and three to five cultivations are done during a fruiting. Nitrogenous fertilizers are applied several times—before and after flowering and after the ovary is shedded in June. Watering promotes fruit bearing and increases the winterhardiness of the trees. A complex of measures is taken to control pests and diseases of fruit crops.

REFERENCES

Plodovodstvo, 2nd ed. Edited by V. A. Kolesnikov. Moscow, 1966.
Burmistrov, A. D. Molodoi plodovyi sad. Leningrad, 1967.
Kolesnikov, E. V. Sovety sadovodam. Moscow, 1973.

E. V. KOLESNIKOV

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

orchard

[′ȯr·chərd]
(agriculture)
A group of fruit-bearing, nut-bearing, or sugar maple trees under cultivation.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
When after several evenings of intense lis- tening she heard no call from the darkness in the orchard, she was half beside herself with grief and decided that for her there was no way to break through the wall that had shut her off from the joy of life.
Louise had so entirely given up the thought of his coming that for a long time she did not hear the call that came up from the orchard. On the Friday evening before, as she was being driven back to the farm for the week-end by one of the hired men, she had on an impulse done a thing that had startled her, and as John Hardy stood in the darkness below and called her name softly and insis- tently, she walked about in her room and wondered what new impulse had led her to commit so ridicu- lous an act.
Higginbotham's character and habits of life; and that he had an orchard, and a St.
On his left were a stone wall and a gate, the boundary of a woodlot, beyond which lay an orchard, farther still, a mowing field, and last of all, a house.
Just then the village clock tolled eight, and as each deep stroke fell, Dominicus gave a fresh bound and flew faster than before, till, dim in the solitary centre of the orchard, he saw the fated pear-tree.
There was the deepest peace in that orchard. It was surrounded by a triple enclosure; the wire fence, then the hedge of thorny locusts, then the mulberry hedge which kept out the hot winds of summer and held fast to the protecting snows of winter.
And I don't mind work a bit, if I don't have to put up with sadness.' She leaned her chin on her hand and looked down through the orchard, where the sunlight was growing more and more golden.
She had only to stand in the orchard, to put her hand on a little crab tree and look up at the apples, to make you feel the goodness of planting and tending and harvesting at last.
But, morning came again, and though the boughs of the orchard trees drooped and ran wild upon the ground, it was the same orchard still.
Mark Rothera, president and chief executive officer of Orchard, said, 'We are at an exciting juncture in our growth as a company as we have an extensive product pipeline with three regulatory filings expected by the end of 2021, making this an opportune time for John to join our Board of Directors.
Singer and 60 Minute Makeover star Peter has joined forces with Bulmers and The Orchard Project to highlight the need for green spaces.
Orchard took on new Spanishspeaking staff at its Cardiff HQ and collaborated with a number of international event companies to help deliver the project successfully.