orchestra pit


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orchestra pit

A pit immediately in front of, or wholly or partly under, the forestage of an auditorium.
References in periodicals archive ?
New York City Opera General Manager and Artistic Director George Steel added: "'From the depths of the orchestra pit up to the seats in the fourth ring, the David H.
About 40 to 50 people then came on, unaware that the orchestra pit cover at the front was not load bearing.
The building also will have an orchestra pit and a music library.
In 1991, Madonna came to rehearse the nominated song from Dick Tracy while the crew awaited paramedics to treat a camera operator who had fallen into the orchestra pit.
Well, I rolled the hula-hoop right into the orchestra pit, hitting two violin players.
music coordinator Seymour "Red" Press, who first served in a Broadway orchestra pit in 1957 for Ethel Merman in "Gypsy," and is still there almost 50 years and more than 100 shows later.
At the heart of the building is a 300 seat theatre with a full flytower, orchestra pit, scene and costume shops, lobby and outdoor stage.
The concept behind Sharon Lockhart's latest work is straightforward enough: Shoot a thirty-minute roll of film, from a single angle, of an audience listening to a piece of music created as a score for the film in question (by composer Becky Allen) and performed live by a chorus offstage in the orchestra pit.
At the matinee performance of Carmen on March 22, 1997, one of my guests attempted to toss a bouquet to Angela Gheorghiu that unfortunately struck one of your colleagues in the orchestra pit.
From the first chorus rehearsal on day one to the final dress rehearsal on day 21, an army of singers, musicians, designers, seamstresses, painters, wig makers, makeup artists, and construction and lighting crews fill the stage, orchestra pit, and wings, doing their separate chores, but working toward a common goal.
Back in the United States, he wrote and produced plays, established theaters, and initiated many innovations, including overhead lighting, the moving or "double" stage, the disappearing orchestra pit, and folding chairs.