order of magnitude


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order of magnitude

[′ȯrd·ər əv ′mag·nə‚tüd]
(chemistry)

order of magnitude

A change in quantity or volume as measured by the decimal point. For example, from tens to hundreds is one order of magnitude. Tens to thousands is two orders of magnitude; tens to millions is three orders of magnitude, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
p], is of order unity, cannot alter the order of magnitude estimates for [a.
NIST researchers now have developed 64-pixel arrays of microcalorimeters to decrease data collection times, enable imaging, and provide an order of magnitude improvement in the analysis of nanoscale particle, thin films, and trace contaminants in materials.
Of course a 650MB CD-R disk is enormously more capacious and--the drive notwithstanding--an order of magnitude cheaper.
At high velocities, "one might be able to have low friction, an order of magnitude lower than one normally has.
The application note points out that the uncertainty in the calibration of power meters can be reduced by one order of magnitude when the technique is used to correct for source and power meter mismatches.
These progressions in technology offer higher bit density, a far greater surface area than other storage mediums, and, more importantly, an increase in order of magnitude in track density.