order of magnitude


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order of magnitude

[′ȯrd·ər əv ′mag·nə‚tüd]
(chemistry)

order of magnitude

A change in quantity or volume as measured by the decimal point. For example, from tens to hundreds is one order of magnitude. Tens to thousands is two orders of magnitude; tens to millions is three orders of magnitude, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
gamma]]| [approximately less than] [GAMMA]/D([much less than]1), then the previous order of magnitude estimates for [a.
The measured NEP was an order of magnitude larger, dominated by the G-R noise of the current-biased PC detector.
This data shows our memory IP is an order of magnitude better than embedded SRAM technologies and comparable to the leading embedded DRAM technologies.
In the past five years alone, Computerworld has won more than 100 print and online awards for editorial and design excellence, surpassing its direct competition by an order of magnitude.
The presence of these initial "threading" defects - generally acceptable in limited numbers - reduces both the number of "threading" defects in the final substrate by one order of magnitude and "dislocation pileups" in the final substrate by as much as three orders of magnitude.
Provide an order of magnitude increase in the available high resolution magnetics in the CCVR;
Our results were better than MySQL's by an order of magnitude and better than average commercial code by two orders of magnitude," said EnterpriseDB CEO Andy Astor.
0GHz, achieves data rate speeds that are an order of magnitude higher than today's mainstream memory systems while utilizing fewer DRAMs and fewer controller pins.
01 mm, surpassing conventional ultrasound imaging by an order of magnitude.
total system capacity by an order of magnitude thanks to