ordering


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Related to ordering: Partial ordering

ordering

[′ȯrd·ə·riŋ]
(mathematics)
A binary relation, denoted ≤, among the elements of a set such that ab and bc implies ac, and ab, ba implies a = b ; it need not be the case that either ab or ba. Also known as order; order relation; partial ordering.
(solid-state physics)
A solid-state transformation in certain solid solutions, in which a random arrangement in the lattice is transformed into a regular ordered arrangement of the atoms with respect to one another; a so-called superlattice is formed.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ordering

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References in periodicals archive ?
Task order execution is dependent on expedited task ordering procedures which are established in the PROS II contract.
Single facilities can also recognize significant savings through a continuing relationship, even if they aren't ordering in the bulk that will merit a manufacturer's discount.
The effects of magnetic impurities and the possibility of magnetic ordering in superconductors have had a rich and interesting history, and neutrons have played an essential role in determining the nature of the magnetic order since the Meissner screening of the superconducting electrons masks the magnetism from most probes.
when ordering, and spent $4,000 on supplies in 1995.
Often, many sales reps would call in orders from the field, tying up phone lines and creating delays in the ordering process.
Although the district court in the Zolin case enforced the summons, it expressly conditioned enforcement by ordering the IRS not to disclose documents to any other governmental agency unless criminal tax prosecution were sought or upon order of the district court.
The researchers acknowledge in their report that laboratory technologists can in many cases improve on physicians' orders through their use of "informal, knowledge-based rules." They also credit computer-based ordering menus used at one of the hospitals for assisting clerks and technologists in their "reinterpretation" of doctors' orders.