ordination

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Related to ordinand: Church of England

ordination:

see ministryministry,
in religion, term used to designate the clergy of Protestant churches, particularly those who repudiate the claims of apostolic succession. The ceremony by which the candidate receives the office of a minister is called ordination.
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; orders, holyorders, holy
[Lat. ordo,=rank], in Christianity, the traditional degrees of the clergy, conferred by the Sacrament of Holy Order. The episcopacy, priesthood or presbyterate, and diaconate were in general use in Christian churches in the 2d cent.
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ordination

a. the act of conferring holy orders
b. the reception of holy orders
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
This is what I would favour, though I am aware that some of the best lay people can move to being ordained through such contact with ordinands. In an individual case, this may be the right thing but overall it can defeat the object of strengthening lay leadership, i.e., of those whose primary focus is outside the church.
In mid-1771 John Ogilvie, the ordinand's brother and a Presbyterian minister in Scotland, sent a note to Jefferson thanking him for the generous friendship he had shown to his brother "whom I love as my own heart;" and he also transmitted a "little complement," which was evidently one of his publications.
The litany is identical, with the obvious exception of the use of the feminine form when referring to the ordinand in the sixth petition.
The same theme could be explored in Southeast Asia in relation to the ordinand's alms bowl, which according to the Vinaya should be of earthenware.
Ayla Lepine is a Visiting Fellow in Art History at the University of Essex and an ordinand at Westcott House
The reader was David Steele and the sermon was given by Charleen Smith, a trainee ordinand from Mirfield, who is training in the Holme Valley.
OPEN TO VIEW: Julie Dray (Church Warden), Laura Leatherbarrow (Ordinand) and Howard Leatherbarrow by the window, below, in St Nicholas Church in Blundellsands Pictures: GAVIN TRAFFORD A MERSEYSIDE church will open its doors on Saturdays for special viewings of a Charles Kempe stained glass window.
While reading Law at Oxford University, he received a vocation to the ordained ministry, and on being accepted as an ordinand of the Church in Wales, began a degree in Theology in Cambridge.
Jesse stars alongside Martin Shaw as young ordinand Raphael in Death In Holy Orders, a gripping murder mystery based on the PD James novel, in which he's at the top of the suspect list.
To the bishop an ordinand was to present testimonials of his character, orthodoxy, and general fitness for the ministry from local clergymen and from the bishop's commissary and governor of the colony.
One used to think that the central moment of ordination occurred when the bishop handed over the paten and chalice (traditio instrumentorum) to the ordinand with the words: "Receive the power of offering sacrifice for the living and the dead." Thus, the famous medieval case problem about a renegade priest who consecrates all the bread in a bake shop assumed that it was a real consecration.
At the same time, it insisted that apostolic practice required that at this "installation/ordination" three bishops must lay hands on the ordinand, and one of them must stand in the "historic episcopate," as described above.