ordinary seaman

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ordinary seaman

a seaman of the lowest rank, being insufficiently experienced to be an able-bodied seaman
References in periodicals archive ?
We see this kind of fracturing in The Ordinary Seamen as certain members of the group fall apart through their abuse of paint solvents as a means of escape.
He was certainly the people's hero and renowned both for his martial achievements and his kindness to ordinary seamen in a harsh age.
A new drive to increase promotion opportunities for ordinary seamen has been launched by the Royal Navy.
No longer the Queen's beloved very private floating palace, where night and day 20 officers and 220 ordinary seamen - or yachtsmen as they were always referred to - trod softly in their special issue rubber-soled sandshoes less the clump of common feet should disturb the Windsors' rest and recreation.
Subtitled The World in a Man-of-War, the novel depicts life aboard a typical frigate, the Neversink, and describes the tyrannies to which ship's officers subject ordinary seamen and the appalling conditions under which the seamen live.
Ollard does pay proper tribute to Churchill's real achievements as a naval administrator, especially in improving the survival chances of ordinary seamen, even as he points out his terrifying capriciousness as an armchair admiral.
The basis for the most lively discussions on the subject literally at every street corner is the fact that the ordinary seamen from the crews of American and British steamships are banned from using the restaurant in the |Intourist' Hotel.
Beginners are classified as ordinary seamen and may be assigned to the deck or engineering department.
This Napoleonic period of maritime history has been well-trawled, indeed, perhaps over-fished by academics, but the experiences of the ordinary seamen have been ignored.
Deck boys, ordinary seamen, able seamen and quartermasters also bell boys, galley boys, assistant stewards and stewards can be obtained at short notice.
Above all, the story of the Fales, her crew, and the ill-fated convoy in which she made her last voyage, is a powerful reminder of how much we owe the ordinary seamen who all to often died miserable and unrecorded deaths.
They joined the crew of the Lusitania as ordinary seamen in New York.