organic


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organic

1. of, relating to, derived from, or characteristic of living plants and animals
2. of or relating to animal or plant constituents or products having a carbon basis
3. of or relating to one or more organs of an animal or plant
4. of, relating to, or belonging to the class of chemical compounds that are formed from carbon
5. of or relating to the essential constitutional laws regulating the government of a state

Organic

Forms that have a structure that perfectly fulfills their own functional requirements; intellectually integrated by a systematic connection and coordination of the parts to the whole.

organic

[ȯr′gan·ik]
(organic chemistry)
Of chemical compounds, based on carbon chains or rings and also containing hydrogen with or without oxygen, nitrogen, or other elements.

organic

Said of a material or compound derived from vegetable or animal life.
References in classic literature ?
Freddie Drummond accepted the doctrine of evolution because it was quite universally accepted by college men, and he flatly believed that man had climbed up the ladder of life out of the weltering muck and mess of lower and monstrous organic things.
I had been born with no organic, chemical predisposition toward alcohol.
Walt Irvine drew himself away with a jerk from the metaphysics and poetry of the organic miracle of blossom, and surveyed the landscape.
The human had to pass through those stages in its rise from the mire and slime of low organic life.
In considering the Origin of Species, it is quite conceivable that a naturalist, reflecting on the mutual affinities of organic beings, on their embryological relations, their geographical distribution, geological succession, and other such facts, might come to the conclusion that each species had not been independently created, but had descended, like varieties, from other species.
The author of the 'Vestiges of Creation' would, I presume, say that, after a certain unknown number of generations, some bird had given birth to a woodpecker, and some plant to the misseltoe, and that these had been produced perfect as we now see them; but this assumption seems to me to be no explanation, for it leaves the case of the coadaptations of organic beings to each other and to their physical conditions of life, untouched and unexplained.
In five little packets which I sent him, he has ascertained no less than sixty-seven different organic forms
When we remember that lime, either as a phosphate or carbonate, enters into the composition of the hard parts, such as bones and shells, of all living animals, it is an interesting physiological fact [6] to find substances harder than the enamel of teeth, and coloured surfaces as well polished as those of a fresh shell, reformed through inorganic means from dead organic matter -- mocking, also, in shape, some of the lower vegetable productions.
It seemed to have become vegetable; to have degenerated in that rank, sunless air to lush lichen or spreading moss that grew in patches to the staircase and was viscid under the foot like organic matter.
It was in their undergraduate days, however, in the midst of their profoundest plunges into the mysteries of organic chemistry, that Doris Van Benschoten entered into their lives.
In nature every species of organic being instinctively adopts and practises those acts which most conduce to the prevalence or supremacy of its kind.
But the logic by which this supposed organic nature of the world is nominally demonstrated appears to realists, as it does to me, to be faulty.