organic solvent


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organic solvent

[ȯr′gan·ik ′säl·vənt]
(organic chemistry)
Liquid organic compound with the power to dissolve solids, gases, or liquids (miscibility); examples are methanol (methyl alcohol), CH3OH, and benzene, C6H6.
References in periodicals archive ?
By using ultra-thin membranes, this is the first clear-cut experiment to show how other solvents can be filtered out, proving that there is potential for organic solvent nanofiltration.
Solvent and Water washing: Residue obtained from filtration was washed with respective organic solvent and was placed on water bath to remove the extra organic solvent.
Washington, July 18 ( ANI ): Workplace exposure to organic solvents is linked to several types of heart defects at birth, a new study has revealed.
In contrast, the effect of organic solvents on silk fiber was rarely found, especially on Eri SF.
Concerning Estonian oil shales, only one dataset on kukersite swelling in watery trichloromethanol could be found and no other studies on organic solvents have been conducted.
Therefore investigation on the behavior of enzymes from moderately halophilic bacteria in the presence of organic solvents may lead to obtain new information on enzymes with organic solvent-tolerant potential.
The water at the bottom retained the catalyst and any remaining fructose, while the organic solvent held the HMF, which could then be easily isolated by evaporation, Dumesic says.
The two most common classes are a) NAPLs composed of fuel hydrocarbons that are lighter (LNAPLs) than water and, thus, more easily detected, because they tend to remain within the unsaturated zone or capillary fringe areas of an aquifer; and b) organic solvent or dense NAPLs (DNAPLs) that tend to migrate deep into formations, becoming entrapped in irregular finger-like structures or pooled on low permeability strata.
Cognitive effects and color blindness are among the documented toxic effects of organic solvent exposure in people who work in industries ranging from nail salons and dry cleaners to medical laboratories and photography labs.
At optimum temperatures and pressures, superheated water behaves in ways similar to an organic solvent, and it can increase solubility.