organic

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organic

1. of, relating to, derived from, or characteristic of living plants and animals
2. of or relating to animal or plant constituents or products having a carbon basis
3. of or relating to one or more organs of an animal or plant
4. of, relating to, or belonging to the class of chemical compounds that are formed from carbon
5. of or relating to the essential constitutional laws regulating the government of a state

Organic

Forms that have a structure that perfectly fulfills their own functional requirements; intellectually integrated by a systematic connection and coordination of the parts to the whole.

organic

[ȯr′gan·ik]
(organic chemistry)
Of chemical compounds, based on carbon chains or rings and also containing hydrogen with or without oxygen, nitrogen, or other elements.

organic

Said of a material or compound derived from vegetable or animal life.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hypothesis: The (a) degree of strategic orientation and structural organicity, (b) the strength of cultural norms favoring entrepreneurial behavior, (c) the strength of the organization's commitment to resources and growth, and (d) the extent to which the organizational reward systems encourage entrepreneurial behavior are positively related to (a) the strength of the organization's competitive capability and (b) the realization of strategic repositioning, (c) to sales growth, (d) higher employee growth, and (c) equity growth.
The recipient has gross memory impairment or organicity.
Business: Organicity -- Transforming Our View of Business 5.
The section compels an urban or architectural structure not only to form an organicity between the parts--between outside and inside--but also to control the spaces between the things built, and their siting on the terrain, to relate geography to history.
It facilitates intrapreneurship through greater organicity.
The second sees the various alternatives in a choice situation as in a relevant sense parts of a whole, subject again to organicity.
15) The glory days of the combat with France are remembered as a moment in which the English were physically united by the power of the state's heralds, in which "the connection of the mail with the state and the executive government--a connection obvious, but yet not strictly defined" (527), was disguised by the apparent naturalness of the mail-coach and its breathing, screaming organicity.
Mechanical reproduction and organicity do not cancel each other in Giger's designs.
they attached themselves to contingent criteria, posed as absolutes: unity, organicity and others" (Speaking of the Middle Ages 46).