organization man


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organization man

a standard character type held by some theorists (especially William Whyte, 1956) to be increasingly found within modern industrial, commercial and some scientific and government organizations, in which executives and managers in an important sense ‘belong’ to the organization, and are dominated by a ‘social ethic‘ rather than an ‘individual ethic’, which leads to conformism and to mediocrity. Essentially the idea applies to Max WEBER's conception of, and fears about, modern BUREAUCRACY.
References in periodicals archive ?
As with William Whyte, in Waldie's text the Organization Man mentality is tied to suburban place.
However, throughout The Organization Man, Whyte is hard pressed to identify just what is wrong with what, at times, appears to be a welcome social alternative to a competitive individualism that produces social inequalities.
The transactional mindset and focus on compliance and conformity of people as objects in The Organization Man were crafted around a mechanistic view of organization, prevalent at that time.
In Hoberek's view, the Invisible Man shares the embattled individuality of the Organization Man.
Further studies answered that question: In the Organization Man era, executives only left the fold if a company didn't deliver on its promise of upward mobility.
In the 1950s, influential works like David Riesman's (1950) The Lonely Crowd, William Whyte's (1956) The Organization Man, and C.
In addition, quiet, henpecked Organization Man Rubio (Manuel Moron), desperate for promotion, goes off the rails when it doesn't happen.
Is William Whyte's Organization Man in an utterly different universe of discourse from C.
When Americans took a good hard look at this narcissistic superwoman who embraced the values of the dominant culture, they grew anxious and frightened, for they no longer saw loyal mothers and wives who would care for the human community, but a dangerous individual, unplugged from home and hearth, in other words, a female version of America's ambitious but lonely organization man," writes Rosen.
Management and Machiavelli, Antony Jay London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1967 The organization man, William H Whyte London: Jonathan Cape, 1957
The stereotypes he presents--the expressive individualist, the Tocquevillian American, the Manichean, the Pelagian, the organization man, and others--do sustain some of his significant claims about their relationships.
The literal and practical organization man had come to dominate American aspirations.

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