organization man

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organization man

a standard character type held by some theorists (especially William Whyte, 1956) to be increasingly found within modern industrial, commercial and some scientific and government organizations, in which executives and managers in an important sense ‘belong’ to the organization, and are dominated by a ‘social ethic‘ rather than an ‘individual ethic’, which leads to conformism and to mediocrity. Essentially the idea applies to Max WEBER's conception of, and fears about, modern BUREAUCRACY.
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Jews and Gentiles, Old Negroes and New Negroes, organization men and radicals, Hebrews from Brooklyn, sharecroppers from Mississippi, Puritans from New England.
These new bedroom communities were "the packaged villages that have become the dormitory of the new generation of organization men.
Unlike the homogenous and stable, perhaps stifling, world of Park Forest and Whyte's organization men, the women in Helgesen's study are faced with a very diverse and unstable world, but one they, as privileged women, are able to transform to meet their styles and their concerns.
Organization men assumed that "the ends of the organization and morality coincide, and on such matters as social welfare they give their proxy to the organization.
We see in the teaser opening a Los Angeles filled with cookie-cutter Organization Men, in gray sack suits and sunglasses, attache cases at the ready.
Judging by the thesis of this splendid book, histories of the Jackson presidency have come a long way since they were graced with titles like The Age of Jackson, for the ultimate irony of the age was the way that organization men like Van Buren dominated an era marked by rampant individualism, hero-worship, and resistance to institutional forms.
The vaguely sinister mood of these vacant scenes, camped up to produce a cinematic effect reminiscent of film noir and B-grade horror films, seems to expose the flipside of the bland, gray Dusseldorf seen in Ruff's earlier series "Haus" (House, 1988-)--a city in which, one imagined, organization men left faceless apartment blocks to work in equally faceless office buildings.
What organization men say or write, or print," he says, means nothing at all, being merely the bureaucratic equivalent of breaking wind.
We might thus see the postmodern deemphasis of character--the dispersal and disappearance of Thomas Pynchon's nominal protagonist Tyrone Slothrop in Grapity's Rainbow (1973), for instance--as paralleling the putative depersonalization of organization men.

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