organosol


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.

organosol

[ȯr′gan·ə‚sȯl]
(materials)
Finely divided or colloidal suspension of insoluble material in a suspending organic liquid; known as plastisol when the solid is a synthetic resin suspended in an organic liquid; used for coatings, moldings, and casting of films.
A dispersion of very finely divided resin particles that are suspended in an organic-liquid mixture which cannot dissolve the resin at normal temperatures.
References in periodicals archive ?
3) Organosol (16) Fibric (3) Sulfidic (3) Hemic (7) Sulfidic (7) Sapric (6) Sulfidic (6) Rudosol (5) Stratic (3) n.
The Soil Orders are Organosols representing soils dominated by organic horizons, Hydrosols representing soils dominated at times by a high water table, Vertosols dominated by cracking clays, and Rudosols representing soils with negligible pedological development.
Similarly in the Organosols, the Sulfuric Great Group precedes the Sulfidic.
Although only 16 Organosols with sulfidic or sulfuric layers were recorded in the risk map survey, this represents an increase of 45% in the number of those previously in the database.
Only the lower hierarchies of the Hydrosols and Organosols are described further because of their relatively large numbers in the risk map survey.
All 3 Suborders that presently exist for Organosols were used and although the actual numbers of profiles are small, they also represent a significant increase on those in the ASC classification database.
Only the Sulfidic Great Group is identifed in the Organosols and is an increase of 12 on those in the ASC database.
3e), often occurring in association with Organosols and Rudosols at higher elevations.
The soils that have developed in such a diverse landscape include Organosols developed on peat, Ferrosols formed on basalt, Tenosols formed on wind blown sands, and easily degraded Sodosols and Kurosols on sediments and sedimentary rocks.
Organosols are the second most dominant Soil Order (14.
Organosols and Rudosols are under represented on the DPIW database with very few profiles described and little analytical data available.