orientalism


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orientalism

  1. the academic study of the Orient, which has been variously defined as the Middle East, the Far East or most of Asia.
  2. a more general perspective, intellectual, artistic or political, which sees the distinction between East and West as one of the fundamental divisions of the world.
  3. ‘a Western style for dominating, restructuring and having authority over the Orient’, (SAID, 1978; definitions 1 and 2 are derived from the same source).
Definition 3 is the subject of Said's analysis, wherein he argues that since the late 18th-century Western writers have constructed an image of the Orient centred around such concerns as the distinctiveness of the ‘Oriental mind’ as opposed to the ‘Occidental mind’. Said argues that this corresponds to no empirical reality and reduces to insignificance the varieties of language, culture, social forms and political structures in the so-called Orient. This imagery has been a significant part of intellectual thought in the West since the AGE OF ENLIGHTENMENT. See also ORIENTAL DESPOTISM, ASIATIC MODE OF PRODUCTION AND ASIATIC SOCIETY, HYDRAULIC SOCIETY.
References in periodicals archive ?
I first encountered this particular brand of Orientalism at the Abenteuer Orient exhibit at the Bundeskunsthalle in Bonn (30 April-10 August 2014), while browsing through a small selection of Max von Oppenheim's collection of costumes and accessories located among his major archeological findings.
Tailing's argument that opera is a humanizing art creates a binary distinction between Said's notion of orientalism and humanism.
Iran is exploiting the issue via what I call "opposite orientalism.
Said's critique of Orientalism has become the epistemological grounds for postcolonial critiques, engaging with the West's limited view of the Orient's ontological limitations of representations of themselves.
But even as Phillips distances herself from the overgeneralizations in current discussions about orientalism and transnational encounter, her work often suffers from the same problem she critiques.
The pulpit of an Orientalism born out of medieval heresiography, morphing into missionarism then colonial litterature de surveillance then area studies still has its preachers to the choir; but from the perspective IEQ has defined as its own, such fault-finding is a confirmation that IEQ is on the right track.
This book approaches the phenomenon of orientalism with an interdisciplinary analysis that traces connections between early orientalist perceptions of Islam and its contemporary manifestations and transformations.
The Orientalism of Lara is, as Warren notes, a gap that somehow, phantasmatically, organizes and produces real effects in the world, a strange paradox that reappears in the final chapter on Keats, where Lamia is that Orient whose entanglement marks Lycius as an unhappy, nervous solipsist.
Prior to providing a detailed exploration of Orientalism, a brief biological sketch of Said will offer insight into his revolutionary theory.
jpg>Churchill and the Islamic World Orientalism, Empire and Diplomacy in the Middle East
Following in the footsteps of artists like Delacroix, whom he greatly admired, this brilliant colourist's Orientalism is similar to that of Henri Regnault, Mariano Fortuny, Georges Clairin, and Jean-Paul Laurens.
Du Camp, for instance, belonged to the Orientalist institution, Societe Orientale, had a government commission from the Ministry of Agriculture and Commerce to photograph historic monuments in Egypt, Palestine, and Syria, was trained prior to his journey by Gustave Le Gray and Alexis de Lagrange to produce good negatives, was accompanied by Gustave Flaubert who fancifully documented their trip, and was finally able to publish his photographs in 1851 using the printing process developed by Blanquart-Evrard--photographs which became immediately successful because of the popular and scholarly interest in Orientalism.