orientalism


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orientalism

  1. the academic study of the Orient, which has been variously defined as the Middle East, the Far East or most of Asia.
  2. a more general perspective, intellectual, artistic or political, which sees the distinction between East and West as one of the fundamental divisions of the world.
  3. ‘a Western style for dominating, restructuring and having authority over the Orient’, (SAID, 1978; definitions 1 and 2 are derived from the same source).
Definition 3 is the subject of Said's analysis, wherein he argues that since the late 18th-century Western writers have constructed an image of the Orient centred around such concerns as the distinctiveness of the ‘Oriental mind’ as opposed to the ‘Occidental mind’. Said argues that this corresponds to no empirical reality and reduces to insignificance the varieties of language, culture, social forms and political structures in the so-called Orient. This imagery has been a significant part of intellectual thought in the West since the AGE OF ENLIGHTENMENT. See also ORIENTAL DESPOTISM, ASIATIC MODE OF PRODUCTION AND ASIATIC SOCIETY, HYDRAULIC SOCIETY.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first is that Orientalism, although purporting to be an objective, disinterested, and rather esoteric field, in fact functioned to serve political ends.
Though Fields' study is not concerned with Orientalism per se, he credits William Jones's sympathetic treatment of Indian religion with the vision of the "oriental renaissance" that appears in Emerson and Thoreau.
Said conceived the focal theme of Orientalism (Kennedy, 2000; Said, 2000).
In Montreal, the exhibition reveals six iconic aspects of Orientalism, offering a dual reading of its fictional subjects, juxtaposing staged pictorial settings with documented realities.
This diagonal and ultimately corrective reading delinks Enlightenment Orientalism from a story of gradual degeneration--from genuine cosmopolitanism to the imperialist imaginative geographies of nineteenth-century imperialism-and then repairs the broken passages and genealogical affiliations with the various classical, philological, and theological projects of the Renaissance and the seventeenth century.
The least satisfying of Ruskola's core arguments is regarding "legal orientalism," a term he introduces: "a tale we tell about who does and does not have law;" and in an addendum, what counts "as law, in the end, [is] law's interpretation of itself" for "in the tautological world of legal Orientalism, law is a narrative that defines itself as legal" (my emphasis p.
Most certainly, the title does not mean that literature before Orientalism was different from literature after Orientalism.
He said when speaking of orientalism, one must examine the evolution of art forms in painting, from the style of expression to the method of execution.
Held at Cambridge University, the conference brought together distinguished scholars, art historians and museum professionals to discuss "Orientality: Cultural Orientalism and Mentality".
More than 30 years after its publication, Orientalism continues to dominate academic discourse and Western media bias when covering the East.
How much does Orientalism contribute to an understanding of the Orient by the Occident?