orientation effect

orientation effect

[‚ȯr·ē·ən′tā·shən i‚fekt]
(electricity)
Those bulk properties of a material which result from orientation polarization.
(physical chemistry)
A method of determining attractive forces among molecules, or components of these forces, from the interaction energy associated with the relative orientation of molecular dipoles.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, coupling tensile strength at location 1 and location 4 is reduced by 20%, if only fiber orientation effect is taken into account.
First of all it should be identified that how different levels of market orientation effect performance outcomes?
It means that only crystallization behavior can be identified by eliminating orientation effect of macromolecules.
Further analysis for the interaction revealed that for faces the orientation effect was significant for both normal (p = .
13] explain market orientation effect on the firm's innovativeness at the first stage, then the innovativeness stimulate both customer royalty and perceived quality of products /services at the second stage, finally, both royalty and perceived quality enhance the organizational performance.
3% measurement uncertainty due to the installation effects, customer interest in the meter orientation effect led to further investigation at the manufacturer's atmospheric test facility in Dresden, Germany.
Table 2 gives the mean comparisons for face grain orientation effect for each combination of glued surface condition and load direction, and Table 3 gives the mean comparisons for load direction effect for each combination of glued surface condition and face grain orientation.
5 indicate a high degree of preferred orientation, which is gradually reduced as r tends to 1, a value in which the preferred orientation effect is considered null.
For instances when a scanner is not available, the software can even recognize text on digital photographs (this is difficult for OCR software because picture quality, focus, and orientation effect recognition).
This orientation effect was consistent even though the ascidians consumed less food in the first experiment than in the second (Fig.
Ebenholtz and Walchli's (1965) first hypothesis suggests that the sinusoidal orientation effect is caused by the lateral separation of the oriented stimulus rather than the horizontal disparity.

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