origin


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origin

1. Anatomy
a. the end of a muscle, opposite its point of insertion
b. the beginning of a nerve or blood vessel or the site where it first starts to branch out
2. Maths
a. the point of intersection of coordinate axes or planes
b. the point whose coordinates are all zero
3. Commerce the country from which a commodity or product originates

origin

[′är·ə·jən]
(anatomy)
The point at which the nonmoving end of a muscle is attached to a bone; it is at the proximal end of the muscle.
(computer science)
Absolute storage address in relative coding to which addresses in a region are referenced.
(mathematics)
The point of a coordinate system at which all coordinate axes meet.
References in classic literature ?
The color of the Indian, the writer believes, is peculiar to himself, and while his cheek-bones have a very striking indication of a Tartar origin, his eyes have not.
Inquiry was made into the origin of the scourge, and by degrees various facts came out which excited public indignation in a high degree.
I told him as much as I thought proper of her illness, and he extorted from me, by cross-examination, most of the facts connected with its origin.
But I am sure I have always thought of Christmas time, when it has come round -- apart from the veneration due to its sacred name and origin, if anything belonging to it can be apart from that -- as a good time; a kind, forgiving, charitable, pleasant time: the only time I know of, in the long calendar of the year, when men and women seem by one consent to open their shut-up hearts freely, and to think of people below them as if they really were fellow-passengers to the grave, and not another race of creatures bound on other journeys.
His language must not be exclusively obsolete and unintelligible; but he should admit, if possible, no word or turn of phraseology betraying an origin directly modern.
His handsome aquiline nose and keen dark eyes proclaimed his Jewish origin, of which he was ashamed.
It was the passions about whose origin we deceived ourselves that tyrannized most strongly over us.
Of the first, those that had an humble origin and rose to the greatness they still preserve, the Ottoman house may serve as an example, which from an humble and lowly shepherd, its founder, has reached the height at which we now see it.
The idea of restraining the legislative authority, in the means of providing for the national defense, is one of those refinements which owe their origin to a zeal for liberty more ardent than enlightened.
It was in old days, with our learned men, an interesting and oft-investigated question, "What is the origin of light?
The origin of the Chinese tone is not a poetical one, but is undoubtedly due to the necessity of having some distinguishing method of accentuation in a language which only contains about four hundred different sounds.
Why, suffering is the sole origin of consciousness.