Medicare

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Related to original Medicare: Medicare Part B

Medicare,

national health insurance program in the United States for persons aged 65 and over and the disabled. It was established in 1965 with passage of the Social Security Amendments and is now run by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Coverage for certain people with disabilities began in 1973. Medicare provides for a basic program of hospital insurance, under which enrollees are protected against major costs of hospital and related care; and a supplementary medical insurance program, through which persons are aided in paying doctor bills and other health-care bills. It is funded by a tax on the earnings of employees that is matched by the employer and by premiums paid by enrollees. In 2012 some 51 million Americans were enrolled in Medicare. Legislation passed in 2003 provides for a drug benefit program (beginning in 2006), higher premiums for enrollees earning more than $80,000, and subsidies over 10 years to encourage private insurers to compete with Medicare.
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Medicare

U.S. program of health insurance for the aged. [Am. Hist.: EB, VI: 747]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Private insurers contract with the government to offer these as an alternative to Original Medicare. By law, they must cover all of the same things as Parts A and B, but they can cover additional services, like dental and vision care and prescription drugs, as well.
Many Medicare Advantage plans offer extra benefits not available with Original Medicare that are designed to enhance people's health and quality of life, such as disease management and wellness programs, gym memberships and in-home health care.
If you opt for original Medicare, you can purchase a Medicare Supplemental Plan (also called "Medigap") for a monthly premium--but you don't have to.
You might owe a $30 copay for a visit to a doctor, for instance, instead of the 20% coinsurance patients owe with original Medicare. If members go outside the network for care, though, they probably face higher costs.
Another definition of "pure research" can also be gleaned from the original Medicare provisions in the Federal Registrar that states hospitals were not reimbursed for costs incurred for research that is above and beyond usual patient care unless it was directly in conjunction with that care.
The ACA also includes cuts in payments to Medicare Advantage plans, private organizations that serve beneficiaries as an alternative to the original Medicare program--the remaining $100,000,000,000 is to come from new revenue sources for the Medicare trust funds.
During open enrollment, enrollees may join a new plan, switch plans, or return to original Medicare. Changes made during this period will be effective the first day of the month after the plan gets the person's enrollment form.
Polls show seniors are more skeptical of the legislation than the public as a whole, even though Democrats would also reinforce original Medicare by improving preventive benefits and narrowing the prescription coverage gap.
(1) For retirees age 65 and older who are enrolled in both Medicare Parts A and B, these plans offer a variety of choices to supplement their original Medicare plan and reduce their health care costs.
The federal government has clearly stated that the expense for a senior on Medicare Advantage is 14% higher than an individual enrolled in original Medicare with a Medigap policy.
Most Medicare beneficiaries may choose to receive benefits through the original Medicare fee-for-service program or through one of the following Medicare Advantage plans:
Most Medicare beneficiaries can choose to receive benefits through the original Medicare fee-for-service program, or through a coordinated care plan (including Health Maintenance Organizations (HMOs), Preferred Provider Organizations (PPOs), and Provider-Sponsored Organizations (PSOs)), or a private fee-for-service plan that reimburses providers on a fee-for-service basis.