original duration

original duration

[ə¦rij·ən·əl də′rā·shən]
(industrial engineering)
The initial estimate of length of time required to complete a given activity.
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If we are well informed, the point of departure for this surprising journey is to be the island of Zanzibar, upon the eastern coast.
Koner, triumphantly demonstrated the feasibility of the journey, its chances of success, the nature of the obstacles existing, the immense advantages of the aerial mode of locomotion, and found fault with nothing but the selected point of departure, which it contended should be Massowah, a small port in Abyssinia, whence James Bruce, in 1768, started upon his explorations in search of the sources of the Nile.
But the directions he had given us about keeping a yellow warehouse on our starboard hand till we opened a white church to the larboard, and then keeping that on the larboard hand till we made a corner three points to the starboard, and that done, then ask the first man we met where the place was: these crooked directions of his very much puzzled us at first, especially as, at the outset, Queequeg insisted that the yellow warehouse --our first point of departure --must be left on the larboard hand, whereas I had understood Peter Coffin to say it was on the starboard.
Athos saw his two friends on the point of departure, and something like a mist passed before his eyes and weighed upon his heart.
Mace dismissed his clerk, and found his other guests, too, on the point of departure.
It was a journey which a rolling stone would make in a few seconds--the lofty point of departure was visible from the village below in the valley.
Mademoiselle Cormon was thought to be one of the richest persons in the town: the poor lad had therefore been led to love her by desires for material happiness, by the hope, long indulged, of gilding with comfort his mother's last years, by eager longing for the ease of life so needful to men who live by thought; but this most innocent point of departure degraded his passion in his own eyes.
It seems to me that the point of departure of my reason would be this--there can be no doubt that the murderer you pursued was in the gallery.
In the relief of having this companion, and of feeling that he could trust him, he passed on to both, and both brought him round again, with an increase and acceleration of force, to his point of departure.
I had thought of forcing the blade in some minute crevice of the masonry, so as to identify my point of departure.
The territorial tax did not entirely disappear in Rabourdin's plan,-- he kept a minute portion of it as a point of departure in case of war; but the productions of the soil were freed, and industry, finding raw material at a low price, could compete with foreign nations without the deceptive help of customs.
amp;nbsp;However, if NASA succeeds in creating a robotic probe that can rendezvous with and refuel a satellite in orbit, it would pave the path for missions that last much longer than their original duration.

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