orographic


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orographic

[¦ȯr·ə¦graf·ik]
(geology)
Pertaining to mountains, especially in regard to their location and distribution.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

orographic

Anything that pertains to, or is caused by, mountains, as in orographic clouds, orographic lift, or orographic precipitation. See orographic clouds.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
The orographic response was likely further modulated by thermodynamic effects, as evidenced in composite vertical profiles of equivalent potential temperature and relative humidity from the NOAA operational High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR; Benjamin et al.
On Oct 3 and 4 Mobberley, Pellier and Poupeau imaged discrete white clouds at Nox Lux and Candor east of the Arsia Mons orographic, as well as less bright clouds over Pavonis Mons and Ascraeus Mons: hence the visibility of the 'W' cloud had begun.
The purpose of this article is to provide an analysis of the orographic lexicon of the Kildin Saami language.
In the LPs, an easterly wind with high humidity lasting for 1-2 days produced easterly orographic low clouds in the Daegwallyeong region.
Areas of high precipitation are highly influenced by moisture-laden trade winds over the Atlantic Ocean that reaches the country from the northeast, producing so-called orographic rainfalls.
According to the mentioned author, the northeast altitude swamps are more humid when compared to the semi-arid region that surrounds the area because of the orographic effect that provides higher rainfall incidence and lower temperatures.
As noted in the preceding section, annual P interpolated between the two permanent stations was taken as an estimate for the Mealy Mountains region, without further adjustment for orographic effects.
Various works [20, 21] have shown the formation of mesolows on the lee side of several mountain ranges of the Iberian Peninsula, a result of a windflow perpendicular to the orographic barrier.
In the mountains the precipitations are primarily of an orographic nature, as the moist winds are forced up the mountainsides, cooling adiabatically as they rise until they reach condensation temperature.
We also used a 75-m digital terrain model to estimate several orographic variables.